Scam of the Day

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Scam of the day – June 28, 2020 – Chase Phishing Scam

Phishing emails, by which scammers and identity thieves attempt to lure you into either clicking on links contained within the email which download malware or providing personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft, are nothing new.   They are a staple of identity thieves and scammers and with good reason because they work. Reproduced below is a copy of a new phishing email presently circulating that appears to come from Chase Bank.  This was sent to me by a regular Scamicide reader.

Chase is a popular target for this type of phishing email because it is one of the largest banks in the United States.  Like so many phishing emails, this one attempts to lure you into responding by making you think there is an emergency to which you must respond. As phishing emails go, this one is pretty good.  It looks legitimate and the version appearing in your email comes with a legitimate appearing Chase logo.   As so often is the case with these type of phishing emails, it does not contain your account number in the email nor is it personally addressed to the receiver of the email.  Another indication that this is a scam is that the name Chase is not capitalized in the first sentence. This particular phishing email tries to lure you into clicking on a link where in the second paragraph, it states, “sign in.”  If you hover over the link, you would find that the address it is sending you to has nothing to do with Chase, but is merely a phony website intended to trick you into providing your username and password.  For security reasons I have removed the link and just replaced it with the words “sign in.”

Here is a copy of the Chase phishing email presently being circulated.

 

In an effort to safeguard your information, chase helps to actively protect and monitor your account in multiple ways. Our monitoring systems detect that your profile or your identity may have been compromised.

Please sign in to verify your account, and update your personal information to prevent an interruption with your online account.

We are constantly developing new security features so that you can be a member of a more secure world.

Please do not reply directly to this automatically generated e-email.

Sincerely,

@ 2020 Chase
Online Service Team

TIPS

There are a number of indications that this is not a legitimate email from Chase, but instead is a phishing email. Legitimate companies would refer to your specific account number in the email.  As with all phishing emails, two things can happen if you click on the links provided.  Either you will be sent to a legitimate looking, but phony website where you will be prompted to input personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or, even worse, merely by clicking on the link, you may download keystroke logging malware that will steal all of your personal information from your computer or smartphone and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.

If you receive an email like this and think it may possibly be legitimate, merely call the customer service number where you can confirm that it is a scam, but make sure that you dial the telephone number correctly because scammers have been known to buy phone numbers that are just a digit off of the legitimate numbers for financial companies, such as Chase to trap you if you make a mistake in dialing the real number.  Alternatively you can go to http://www.chase.com to check on your account.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide’s list of Coronavirus was recently featured in the New York Times.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 27, 2020 – Dangerous AT&T Phishing Email

In the years that I have been writing Scamicide, I have written many times about the extreme danger presented by phishing emails.  These are emails that attempt to lure you into  either clicking on links in the email that download harmful malware such as ransomware or providing personal information used to make you a victim of identity theft.  All phishing emails have in common that they appear to alert you to some type of emergency to which you must quickly respond.  Below is a copy of a phishing email that was sent to a business owner who is a Scamicide reader who unfortunately became a victim of the scam as did many other people.  As a result of clicking on a link in the email, malware was downloaded that enabled the scammer to gain access to the victim’s customer emails.  It can be expected that the scammers will use those emails and the knowledge of their relationship with the Scamicide reader’s business to craft more personally targeted phishing emails called spear phishing emails.  These spear phishing emails are even more likely to convince the targeted victims to click on links or provide information to their detriment.  This tactic was used against JP Morgan Chase a few years ago when they suffered a data breach after an employee clicked on a link in a phishing email and the scammers gained access to the names and email addresses of JP Morgan Chase’s customers to whom the criminals later sent spear phishing emails that lured their victims into an investment scam.  Here is a copy of the email sent to the Scamicide reader.

 

From: AT&T YAHOO <******@frontier.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 08:23:38 AM PDT
Subject: Yahoo Final Warning!
We have a new unified Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
Dear Valued User,
Today our records indicate that your mail is out of date due to some recent changes made to our software, Which has caused some incoming mails to be placed on pending status. Kindly UPDATE your mail now in order to be able to receive new mails.
Thanks,
AT&T
TIPS
While there are sometimes telltale signs that a phishing email is not legitimate, such as the email address of the sender not being one used by the real company, the lack of the real name of the recipient of the email when these are sent out as mass mailings, the lack of an account number or spelling and grammatical errors, there are many phishing emails that will appear quite legitimate in every fashion.  Remember my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  You can never be sure when you receive an email, text message or phone call as to who is really contacting you so you should never click on links, download attachments or provide personal information unless you have absolutely confirmed that the communication is legitimate even if the email or text message appears to come from a trusted source..  It is also important to remember that even if you are using the most up to date security software on your cell phone, computer or other electronic device, you are not protected from the latest forms of malware.  It generally takes the security software companies at least a month before they come up with security updates for the latest zero day defects.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide.com was recently cited by the New York Times as a good source for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 26, 2020 – Unusual Coronavirus Stimulus Check Scam

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed documents in federal court seeking a permanent injunction against Traffic Jam Events, LLC and its owner, David J. Jeansonne II to stop an incredibly deceptive scam by which the defendants used false promises regarding the CARES Act stimulus payments to lure unsuspecting people to a used car lot.  The scam starts with a letter in an envelope copied below which appears to come from the federal government and falsely indicates that it relates to the CARES Act stimulus payments.  Inside the envelope is a letter that falsely further indicates that the letter is from the federal government and is a part of the CARES Act.  Inside is what appears to be a check, copied below, which the receiver of the letter is told he or she must claim in person at a designated temporary site to which they are directed. If they go to the designated site, they find that it is a used car sale and not a part of the CARES Act.

The mock check included in the mailer

The envelope used for the defendants’ mailer

TIPS

One of the first indications that this is a scam is that if you are receiving your CARES Act payment by mail, it will not come in an envelope indicating in large letters that it pertains to the CARES Act.  Additionally, the phony check does not come in a figure that relates to the payments being made under the CARES Act.  Also, the check indicates that it is part of the Stimulus Relief Program.  The truth is that the official name for the program as used by the federal government is Economic Impact Payments.  Finally, all real CARES Act payments are made either by direct deposit into your bank account, a debit card sent to you in the mail or a check sent to you in the mail.  There are no temporary sites to pick up or claim your payments.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 25, 2020 – Grandparent Scam Still Claiming Victims

Many of you are familiar with the grandparent scam where a grandparent receives a telephone call from someone purporting to be their grandchild who has gotten into some trouble, either a traffic accident, legal trouble or medical  problems in a far away place.  The caller pleads for the grandparent to wire some money immediately to help resolve the problem.  However the caller also begs the grandparent not to tell mom and dad.  One would think that no one would be gullible enough to fall for this scam, but don’t be so hard on the victims of this scam.  Scam artists, the only criminals we refer to as artists, have a knowledge of psychology of which Freud would have been envious and are able to use that knowledge to persuade their victims to send money right away. The Federal Trade Commission is now warning people about a new version of this scam in which the grandparents receive a call purportedly from a grandchild who is ill with the Coronavirus and needs immediate funds sent to him or her.

Recently a Wisconsin woman was scammed out of $7,500 by a scammer posing as her granddaughter who needed money because she claimed she had just been arrested for drunk driving.  The victim sent the money by Federal Express the next day.  The scammers then attempted to trick their victim into sending an additional $12,800 allegedly for medical costs and to settle a civil action related to the alleged drunk driving, but the victim who had already lost $7,500 to the scammers sensed something was wrong and refused to send the payment.  Later that day she found out that her granddaughter was fine.

TIPS

Sometimes the scammers do not know the name of their victim’s grandchildren, but often they do.  Sometimes they get this information from reading obituaries which may contain the names of grandchildren so merely because the correct name is used in the call is no reason to believe the call.  Don’t respond immediately to such a call without calling the real grandchild on his or her cell phone or call the parents and confirm the whereabouts of the grandchild.  If a medical problem is the ruse used, you can call the real hospital.  If legal problems are the hook you can call the real police.  You can also test the caller with a question that could be answered only by the real grandchild, but make sure that it really is a question that  only the real grandchild could answer and not just anyone who might read the real grandchild’ s Facebook page or other social media.

Never wire money unless you are absolutely sure about to whom you are wiring the money and it is not a scam.  Once you have wired money, it is gone forever.  Also,  students traveling abroad should register with the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui/.  This program can help with communications in an emergency situation.

Here is a video created by the FTC that tells you more about the grandparent scam.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.” Scamicide’s list of Coronavirus scams was recently featured in the New York Times.

Scam of the day – June 24, 2020 – Coronavirus Increasing Real Estate Conveyancing Scams

I have been reporting to you about this particular scam preying upon home buyers for four years, however due to the current Coronavirus pandemic this scam has gotten worse.  Scammers have been quick to take advantage of so much of home buying and selling during this time of social isolation being done virtually with Zoom meetings replacing in person meetings, online home tours and digital signing of documents with states allowing notarizations to be done online.  Last year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a warning about the scam and its dramatic increase even before the Coronavirus pandemic.   The scam targets people involved in the purchase and sales of residential real estate. The scam begins with the hacking into the email accounts of any of the various people involved in the sale.  This can be either the buyer, seller, lawyers, title company, real estate agent or  mortgage banker.  Unfortunately, hacking into email accounts is a relatively easy thing for a skilled identity thief to do.  The hackers then monitor the communications regarding the progress of the sale of a particular piece of real estate and when the time is right,  generally posing as one of the lawyers, title company or bank mortgage officer, the scammer will email the buyer, telling him or her that funds necessary to complete the sale need to be wired to the phony lawyer’s, title company’s or banker’s account provided in the email.  Everything appears normal so unsuspecting buyers too often are wiring the money to the cyberthieves who then launder the money by moving the funds from account to account to make it difficult to trace the funds.

TIPS

Even if you are not involved in buying or selling a home, it is always a good idea to protect your email account from being hacked.  This means having a strong password and security question.  You can find information about how to pick strong passwords and security questions here in the Scamicide archives as well as in my book “Identity Theft Alert.”  Maintain good anti-virus and anti-malware software on all of your electronic devices including your computer as well as your smartphone and keep your security software up to date with the latest security patches as soon as they are made available.  Don’t click on links in emails or text messages that may contain malware that can steal your personal information from your electronic devices.

Also, enterprising hackers are able to change passwords of their intended victims by answering a security question and then being able to change the victim’s password and take over the account.  This was what happened years ago to Sarah Palin when a hacker answered the security question for her email account and was able to change the password and take over the account.  Her question was where did she meet her husband and the answer was Wasilla High School which was found by the hacker by going to Sarah Palin’s Wikipedia page.  You may think that you are not famous and that information to answer your security question is not readily available, but you might be surprised by both how much personal information you and others post about you on social media that could be used to provide the answers to you security questions as well as the wide array of information about you that is available online such as your mother’s maiden name which is a common security question.  The solution to this problem is simple.  When you initially set up your security question, use a nonsensical answer.  Thus the answer to your mother’s maiden name question could be “firetruck.”  It is silly enough for you to remember and no hacker will ever be able to guess it.

Don’t use public WiFi for any financial or business purposes.  Use a virtual private network to encrypt your data when using your electronic devices in public.  Never provide personal information in response to an email regardless of how legitimate it may appear until you have independently confirmed that the email is legitimate.  Finally, whenever you are asked through an email or text message to wire funds as a part of a real estate or other business transaction, don’t do so until you have confirmed that the request and the account to which you are being asked to wire the funds are legitimate.  Appearances can be deceiving so always confirm.  It may seem a bit paranoid, but remember, even paranoids have enemies.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide’s list of Coronavirus scams was recently featured in the New York Times.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 23, 2020 – Critical Update Issued for Adobe Flash

Adobe has just issued new security updates for the popular, but intensely flawed Adobe Flash software. In 2018 Adobe confirmed that it will stop updating and distributing Adobe Flash at the end of 2020 although frankly, it would be wise for you to migrate away from this very vulnerable software program as soon as possible. In 2010 Steve Jobs loudly complained about Adobe Flash’s lack of security and would not allow it to used on iPhones, iPods and iPads due to its serious susceptibility to being hacked. Flaws in Adobe Flash have been exploited by hackers and identity thieves against individuals, companies and government agencies including the U.S. State Department and the White House. Adobe will still be issuing security patches until the end of this year, but now is a good time to move away from Adobe Flash if you have not already done so.

It is always important to update all of the software you use with the latest security updates and patches as soon as they are available. Numerous hacks and data breaches could have been avoided if individuals as well as companies installed security updates when they became available. Hackers take advantage of the fact that many of us procrastinate installing security software to our great detriment. The major data breach at Equifax that affected 148 million people involved a security flaw in Apache software for which a patch had already been issued months earlier, but Equifax had not yet installed.

TIPS

If you are going to continue to use Adobe Flash, it is imperative that you update your software with the latest security patches when they are issued.  Here is a link to the latest updates for Adobe Flash.
https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/current-activity/2020/06/09/adobe-releases-security-updates

However, it may well be time for you to replace Adobe Flash to avoid future problems.
Here is a link to a website with alternative plugins you may wish to consider to replace Adobe Flash.
http://alternativeto.net/software/flash-player/

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 22, 2020 – Scammers Attacking Mobile Banking Apps

In 2019, 75% of Americans used mobile bank apps to some degree for their personal banking needs.   However,since the Coronavirus pandemic hit, even more people are using these apps to conveniently do their banking.  This fact has not been lost on hackers and scammers who have in recent years increasingly focused much of their attention on scams and hacking of mobile phones.  One of the more effective tactics used by hackers is to create malicious apps called banking trojans which appear to the targeted victim to be a legitimate app such as a game or tool which the victim downloads.  Once downloaded, the malicious app stays dormant until the victim goes to use their legitimate banking app at which time it creates a phony version of the victim’s bank’s login page which appears on top of the legitimate app. The victim then inputs his or her username and password into the malicious app thereby providing this information to the hacker.  Making this crime even more devious is the fact that once the victim has inputted his or her information, the banking trojan sends the victim to the real banking app login page so the victims do not become immediately aware that they have been hacked .

Another technique used by hackers is to create phony banking apps that appear to be the banking apps of major banks and offer them on major legitimate app stores.  People using these counterfeit apps think that they are providing their username and password to their bank when they use these apps, but instead are providing them to a hacker.  Despite the best efforts of the major legitimate app stores to police their sites, according to the FBI in 2018 there were close to 65,000 phony banking apps that were available on the legitimate major app stores.

TIPS

As you can see, it can be very easy to become a victim of a mobile banking app attack.  Although the major legitimate app stores try to vet the apps that are offered on their sites, they are not perfect.  I suggest that when possible you obtain the banking app for your particular bank directly from the website of your bank.  Most banks will provide a link to their mobile banking app on their website.  As I often suggest, you also should use dual factor authentication whenever possible to protect the security of your online activities, particularly banking.  Through the use of dual factor authentication using biometrics, hardware tokens, authentication apps or text messages to your cell phone you can protect the security of your transaction even if someone is able to hijack your username and password.  Also, remember your bank will not call you or text you asking for dual factor passcodes.  Hackers often pose as your bank and will call you or text message you and ask for this information under some pretext.  Don’t give it to them.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 21, 2020 – FTC Sends Warning Letters to 30 More Coronavirus Treatment Scammers

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently announced that it had sent out 30 more warning letters to companies marketing phony cures and treatments for the Coronavirus.  This brings the total number of companies who have received such cease and desist letters to 250 and this number most likely represents only a small number of the companies trying to foist worthless cures and treatments on a public eager to find some defense to this pandemic.  The most recent letters sent by the FTC focused on companies selling bogus treatments involving intravenous (IV) Vitamin C and D infusions, supposed stem cell therapy, vitamin injections, essential oils and CBD products.  Other letters from the FTC challenged claims of companies as to cures for the Coronavirus through infrared heat, oral peroxide gel and oxygen therapy.  None of the treatments or  supposed cures have any scientific support for the claims that they can treat or prevent the Coronavirus.. Here is  link to a list of the companies receiving the most recent warning letters sent by the FTC and the FDA demanding them to stop making claims that their products can treat or cure the Coronavirus. https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2020/06/ftc-sends-letters-warning-30-more-marketers-stop-making?utm_source=govdelivery

According to FTC Chairman Joe Simons, “There is a high level of anxiety over the potential spread of Coronavirus.  What we don’t need in this situation are companies preying on consumers by promoting products with fraudulent prevention and treatment claims.  These warning letters are just the first step.  We’re prepared to take enforcement actions against companies that continue to market this type of scam.”

TIPS

As for healthcare products in general, you should be skeptical about companies that promise miraculous cures to illnesses and medical conditions.  The world is full of snake oil salesmen.  You should also be wary of any healthcare product that is sold exclusively either over the Internet or through mail-order advertisements. The best course of action is to ask your physician about the effectiveness of a particular product or program before you buy it.  As for the Coronavirus specifically, the best places to get reliable information are the World Health Organization https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus or the Centers for Disease Control https://www.cdc.gov/

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 20, 2020 – Father’s Day Scams

Tomorrow is Father’s Day which for many people is an opportunity to show our fathers how much we love and appreciate them.  For scam artists, it is yet another opportunity to scam people.
One of the most common Father’s Day scams involves e-cards which are great, particularly for those of us who forget to send a Father’s Day card until the last minute.  This year, in particular, we may see many more e-cards being sent for Father’s Day because of the inconvenience involved in buying traditional greeting cards during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Identity thieves send emails purporting to contain a link to an electronic Father’s Day card, but instead of an electronic greeting card, what they actually  are sending is malware that becomes downloaded when the victim clicks on the link. A common type of malware sent by criminals is keystroke logging malware enables an identity thief to steal personal information from the victim’s computer that can be used for purposes of identity theft.  In other instances, the malware is ransomware which will encrypt all of your data which the hacker threatens to destroy unless you pay a cryptocurrency ransom.

TIPS

Never click on a link to open an electronic greeting card unless the e card specifically indicates who sent the card. Phony e cards will not indicate the name of the sender.  Even if the sender is someone you recognize, you should independently confirm with that person that they indeed sent you an e card before clicking on the link.  Don’t depend upon your security software to protect your phone, computer or tablet because even the most up to date security software will always be behind the latest zero day defect malware.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide’s list of Coronavirus was recently featured in the New York Times.

Also, for those of you working at home during the pandemic, here is a link to a helpful article in which I was one of the people interviewed that provides tips for cybersecurity awareness for employees.  https://www.vpnranks.com/blog/cybersecurity-awareness-for-employees/

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – June 19, 2020 – BB&T Phishing Email

The phishing email that makes up today’s Scam of the day is  very well crafted.  It was sent to me by a Scamicide reader and her first name appeared in the phishing email making it appear legitimate.  For privacy purposes I have crossed out the Scamicide reader’s name.    The email is a scam and if you click on the links contained in the email, you will either be prompted to provide personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or alternatively, merely by clicking on the link, you will download keystroke logging malware that will steal your personal information from your computer or smartphone and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.  I have deleted the links.  The logo found on the email is a good copy, but it is important to remember that it is a simple matter to counterfeit a logo.  One indication that the email is a scam is that it does not provide an account number.   Unlike many phishing emails that may originate in foreign countries where English is not the primary language, this phishing email does not have any glaring spelling or grammatical errors.  As with all phishing emails the intention is to scare you into responding to a purported emergency.

Here is a copy of the email.

BB&T Logo BB&T Client Protection Logo
Name: ********
An Update on Your Online Profile
This is an automated message. Please do not reply directly to this email.
Rebecca: Online Banking Account Locked
Date: 06/08/2020
Time: 09:31 AM EST
Profile Change: Account Locked
As a security measure, your online account has been locked because of too many unsuccessful login attempts. To reset your password, select the Forgot your Password? link on the logon screen.
Services | Privacy & Security | Legal | Fraud
Questions?
Please do not reply to this email. For assistance, please visit our Contact Us page or call 888-BBT-ONLINE (888-228-6654)
Found this email in your spam or junk mail?
Add alerts@message.bbt.com to your safe senders list to make sure your alerts are delivered to your inbox.
You can make changes to your alerts at any time by logging in to online banking.
Branch Banking and Trust Company; Member FDIC.
BB&T, 200 West Second Street, PO Box 1250, Winston Salem, NC 27101-1250.
Copyright © 2020, Branch Banking and Trust Company. All rights reserved.
TIPS
Although this email looks legitimate it is important to remember that your bank is not going to ask you to confirm your personal and account information, however an identity thief will.   Most importantly to avoid a wide variety of scams, you should never click on any link in an email or text message or provide information in response to an email, phone call or text message until you have confirmed that it is legitimate and the only way to do this if you receive such an email is to contact the company by phone at a number that you know is accurate to find out for yourself whether or not the communication is a scam.  Trust me, you can’t trust anyone.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

  • Categories