Scam of the Day

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Scam of the day – May 6, 2021 – Happy World Password Day

Today is World Password Day, which is a day dedicated toward inspiring people to choose better passwords for their various online accounts. Each year the password manager company NordPass does a study of the worst passwords commonly used. These easily discerned passwords make their users particularly vulnerable to identity theft. These passwords become available to identity thieves through data breaches and can be found on the Dark Web, that part of the Internet where criminals buy and sell goods and services. Also, sophisticated hackers use software to discover common passwords.  According to NordPass this year the top ten most common and easily cracked passwords were in order: 123456, 123456789, picture1, password, 123445678, 111111, 123123, 12345, 1234567890 and senha.  Each of these would take little time for a determined hacker to crack.  Some other popular and weak passwords that didn’t make the top ten include: iloveyou, pokemon, unknown, monkey, princess, superman, soccer and letmein. All of these are tremendously poor passwords that can result in your easily becoming a victim of identity theft.

We all have many devices and online accounts that require a password. While it is always a good idea to use dual factor authentication and other security enhancements when available, a good, strong password is still at the core of protecting yourself in the digital world. Unfortunately, too many people use common passwords that are too easy for an identity thief to guess and this can lead to identity theft. In addition, many people use the same password for each of their online accounts which puts them in jeopardy when a data breach at just one place provides the password to all of his or her accounts to a cybercriminal.

TIPS

This list represents another warning that you should have a unique and distinct password for each of your online accounts.  This is not as difficult as it may appear.  You can start with a strong base password constructed from a phrase, such as IDon’tLikePasswords. Add a few symbols like !!! and then adapt it for each account you have so that you will have a secure and easy to remember password for each of your online accounts.   Thus, your Amazon password could be IDon’tLikePasswords!!!AMA.

Password managers which will create and store unique passwords for each of your accounts are also a good option.

Whenever possible use dual factor authentication for your accounts so that when you attempt to log in, a one-time code will be sent to your cell phone to insert in order to get access to your account.  For convenience sake you can set up dual factor authentication so that it is only required if you are logging in from a different computer or device than you normally use.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was recently cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – May 5, 2021 – New Report Shows Impostor Scams Dramatically Increasing

Impostor scams have long been among the most lucrative for scammers.  While there are many variations of this scam, the most common variations have involved scammers calling their intended victims on the telephone posing as some governmental agency such as the, FBI, IRS or the Social Security Administration.  The scammer then, under a wide variety of pretenses, demands an immediate payment by gift cards, credit card or wired funds. Being asked to pay by gift cards is a definite indication that the call is a scam since no governmental agency requests or accepts payments by gift cards.   Alternatively, the scammer demands the victim supply the phony governmental agent with personal information such as your Social Security number which will then be used for identity theft purposes.

I reported to you recently that the Boston Office of the FBI issued a warning about this type of scam and indicated that there has been a substantial increase in the frequency of these scams.  Now we have a report just released by virtual private network company Atlas VPN (virtual private network or VPNs are a service that provide security when using email) indicating that last year Americans lost more than a billion dollars to impostor fraud, which was a 106.56% increase over such losses in the previous year continuing a disturbing five year trend.

TIPS

As I have often reminded you, through the simple technique of “spoofing” it is very easy for a scammer to manipulate your Caller ID to make a call coming to you appear legitimate when it is not.  Therefore you can never truly trust your Caller ID.  Trust me, you can’t trust anyone. Even though your Caller ID may indicate that the call is coming from the FBI, the IRS or some other government agency the call is coming from a scammer.  It is important to note that the FBI never collects cash fines ordered by a court and it will not call or email you to demand a payment of threaten arrest.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – May 4, 2021 – Social Security Scammers Sentenced to Prison

Last week  a married couple, Mehulkumar Manubhai Patel and Chaitali Dave were sentenced to prison in Georgia for their role in a Social Security phone scam.  Phone scammers calling from India called targeted victims in the United States telling them that their Social Security numbers were somehow involved in crimes.  The victims were then threatened with arrest and huge financial penalties unless they mailed cash to criminal accessories such as Patel and Dave located in the United States.  According to Acting U.S. Attorney Kurt R. Erskine, “International call centers continue to victimize the elderly and most vulnerable members of our community.”    Making the problem worse is that through a technique called “spoofing” scammers are able to manipulate your Caller ID so that the call you receive appears to come from the Social Security Administration, U.S. Marshall or some other legitimate agency.

TIPS

No law enforcement agency will ever call you and demand a payment in cash to resolve a problem so whenever you get a call such as this, you can feel confident it is a scam.  An easy way to avoid becoming a victim of similar scams where scammers call posing as the Social Security Administration is to remember that the Social Security Administration will never initiate any contact with you by telephone call, email or text message.  Any communication you receive in this manner that is not in response to your own telephone call or email is a scam.  On a larger scale, it is important to remember that you can never be sure whenever you get an email, text message or phone call as to who is really contacting you so you should never give a credit card number, gift card number, wire funds, send cash or provide personal information to anyone in response to an email, text message or phone call unless you have independently confirmed that the communication was legitimate and that information from you is absolutely required.  Trust me, you can’t trust anyone.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.” Scamicide was recently cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – May 3, 2021 – Free CBD Oil Scam

With marijuana use being legalized throughout much of the United States, Cannabidiol (CBD) products are quite popular for a number of uses including decreasing anxiety, pain relief and as a non-addictive sleep aid.  Scammers are always using whatever is popular with the public as a vehicle for scamming you so it is not surprising that many people are seeing ads on social media, websites and emails touting free bottles of CBD Oil or CBD Gummies.  All you need to do is to provide your credit or debit card to cover the small cost of of shipping and you are told you will receive your free CBD product.  Unfortunately, the truth is that these free offers are scams and if you read the fine print you will find that you actually have signed up for monthly deliveries costing you anywhere between $80 to $100 per month.  Calling the company and trying to cancel the order generally is futile.

Some of the brand names tied to this scam include HempVive, Pure CBD, New Leaf Naturals, True CBD and Pro Naturals.  Also remember B.S. – Be skeptical.  Many of these scams appear to be endorsed by celebrities such as Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil, Oprah, Willie Nelson and Steve Harvey.  The truth is that none of them are endorsing these scams.  The scammers are just using their names without permission.

TIPS

It is always important to read the “fine print” in any contract for the ordering of products.  Rarely will you find anything “fine” in fine print, but in many scams, buried within the long agreement will be a term to which never agreed upon. Also, it is important each month to carefully go through the charges on your credit cards to make sure that there are no fraudulent charges.  The earlier you catch a problem, the easier it is to fix it.  Also, as I constantly remind you, don’t use your debit card for anything other than an ATM card.  It is much more difficult to stop fraudulent charges such as are found in this scam if you used your credit card rather than your debit card to make the initial payment.

If, as expected, the company refuses or delays cancelling the ongoing order, contact your credit card company and tell them to stop future payments and ask them to file a “fraud chargeback” against the company to get the refund of money you gave them under false pretenses.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.” Scamicide was recently cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – May 2, 2021 – FTC Sending Refunds to Victims of Credit Card Interest Rate Reduction Scam

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC)  in conjunction with the Attorney General of Florida brought legal action against E. M. Systems & Services which, using a variety of different names, set up websites and cold called people falsely claiming that they could save them thousands of dollars by reducing their credit card interest rates.  E.M. Systems & Services charged between $695 and $1,495 for their false promises that they backed with an equally worthless money back guarantee.   Not only did the victims of this scam not receive the promised rate reductions, but they also did not receive their money back when they requested refunds.  Now the FTC is sending full refunds to the victims of the scam.

For more information about this particular refund program check out the “FTC Scam Refunds” tab in the middle of the first page of http://www.scamicide.com. You also can find information there about the mailing of the refund checks.  There is no cost or fee to file a claim or get a refund.  Anyone who tells you differently is trying to scam you.

TIPS

It is important to remember that the FTC’s Telemarketing Sales Rules specifically prohibit charging advance fees before providing any debt relief services.  Any company that requires an advance fee before they have completed their successful debt reduction services is breaking the law.  You also may want to consider avoiding scams like this by enrolling in the federal Do Not Call List so that if you are contacted by a telemarketer, you already know it would be someone who is knowingly breaking the law and cannot be trusted.  Registering for the Do Not Call List is easy and free.  Merely go to http://www.donotcall.gov to register your phone number.

If you need real credit counseling you can go to this section of the Department of Justice’s website where it lists agencies approved to assist consumers with debt problems. https://www.justice.gov/ust/list-credit-counseling-agencies-approved-pursuant-11-usc-111    You also may consider contacting companies that are affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling at this link https://www.nfcc.org/

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – May 1, 2021 – New AOL Phishing Scam

Today’s Scam of the day is about a phishing email presently circulating that attempts to lure you into clicking on a link in order to continue using your AOL account.  Millions of people still use AOL.  One reason is that you get greater email privacy when compared to some other email carriers. Due to its popularity, scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below that was sent to me by a Scamicide reader. If you click on the link in the email where it reads “Upgrade Now” one of two things can occur and both are bad.  Either you will end up providing personal information to an identity thief or you will, merely by clicking on the link, download dangerous malware such as ransomware on to your phone, computer or other device.

Here is the email presently being circulated.  The link where it reads ” Upgrade Now” has been disabled.  If you had hovered your mouse over the original link, you would have seen that it would have taken you to a site that wasn’t related to AOL.

“Dear Customer

Your AOL Email as being outdated, failure to upgrade to the newest
AOL Email 8.1 now will result to a permanent account closure.

According to provision 17.9 of terms and conditions, AOL may at anytime
terminate its services for your account.

To upgrade follow the link below and accept our new terms and conditions.

Upgrade Now

Thank you for your understanding.

Privacy Policy | Customer Support | Unsubscribe
© 2021 Verizon Media. All Rights Reserved.
22000 AOL Way, Dulles, VA 20166.

TIPS

When AOL communicates with its customers about their accounts, they do so by AOL Certified Mail, which will appear as a blue envelope in your inbox and will have an official AOL Mail seal on the border of the email.   No official AOL Mail seal appears in the inbox.  This email also does not refer to you in the salutation, but merely reads “Dear Customer”.   Whenever you get an email, you cannot be sure who is really sending it.   In the case of this email, the email address of the sender had no relation to AOL and most likely was the email address of someone whose email account was hacked and made a part of a botnet of computers used by cybercriminals to send such communications.  Never click on a link unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate.  If you think the email might be legitimate, the best thing to do is to contact the real company that the email purports to be from at an email address or phone number that you know is accurate in order to find out if the communication was legitimate or not.

Another indication that this is a scam is the poor grammar in the first paragraph.  Often such poor grammar is an indication that the scam has originated in a country where English is not the primary language.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – April 30, 2021 – FTC Brings First Charges Under COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act

Recently the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against Eric Anthony Nepute and his company Quickwork LLC for violating the COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act by deceptively marketing products containing Vitamin D and zinc as being scientifically proven to be able to treat or prevent COVID-19.  This is the first case filed by the FTC using this new law which was passed in 2020 and made it illegal to engage in deceptive marketing related to the treatment, cure, prevention, mitigation or diagnosis of COVID-19.  Nepute and his company sold the bogus supplement under the brand name “Wellness Warrior” claiming it was even more effective than the COVID-19 vaccines.

According to FTC Chairman Joe Simons, “There is a high level of anxiety over the potential spread of Coronavirus.  What we don’t need in this situation are companies preying on consumers by promoting products with fraudulent prevention and treatment claims.”

TIPS

As for healthcare products in general, you should be skeptical about any company that promises miraculous cures to illnesses and medical conditions.  The world is full of snake oil salesmen.  You should also be wary of any healthcare product that is sold exclusively either over the Internet or through mail-order advertisements. The best course of action is to ask your physician about the effectiveness of a particular product or program before you buy it.  As for the Coronavirus specifically, the best places to get reliable information are the World Health Organization https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus or the Centers for Disease Control https://www.cdc.gov/

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was recently cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and click on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – April 29, 2021 – PayPal Phishing Email

Here is another good example of a phishing email that is presently being circulated. It was sent to me by a Scamicide reader who received it.  It makes for compelling reading, but it is a scam.  Phishing emails, by which scammers and identity thieves attempt to lure you into either clicking on links contained within the email which will download malware or providing personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft, are nothing new.  They are a staple of identity thieves and scammers and with good reason because they work.  As always, they lure you by making it appear that there is an emergency that requires your immediate attention or else dire consequences will occur.  Copied below is a new phishing email  presently being sent to unsuspecting people that appears to come from PayPal.  It contains a PayPal logo, but that is easy to counterfeit.   A telltale sign that this is a phishing email is that the email address of the sender was one that has nothing to do with PayPal and was most likely part of a botnet of computers infected by scammers and then used to send out the phishing email in a way that is not readily traceable back to the scammer.

Date- 04/19/2021
Transaction id- 6xsdres548fds21587
Toll Free – 1-844-858-2217
PayPal Email ID PP843,
You sent a payment of 894.99 USD to xxxxxxxxxxxx@gmail.com
We’ve asked the seller to ship.
Thanks for using PayPal. To view the transaction details, log in to your PayPal account.
If this wasn’t you, Please call us immediately at 1-844-858-2217 report this incident and block this transaction
It may take a few moments for this transaction to appear in the Recent Activity list in your Account Overview.
Seller
xxxxxxxxxxx@gmail.com
Shipping address
Amanda Fayette
49 McLaughlin Road
Bentley Park, Queensland 4869
Australia
Note to seller
You haven’t included a note.
Shipping details
The seller hasn’t provided any shipping details yet.
Description Unit price Qty Amount
Apple iPhone 12 – 64 GB – Black (Unlocked)
Item number 43ccd867ea
874.99 USD 1 874.99 USD
Ebay Logo Shipping and handling
Insurance – not offered Total
20.00 USD

894.99 USD

TIPS

Legitimate emails from a company with which you do business would include the last four digits of your account and include your name.  This email had neither.   Obviously, if you are not a PayPal customer, you will recognize immediately that this is a scam.  As with most phishing emails, they lure you into clicking on a link or calling on the phone by attempting to trick you into believing there is an emergency that you must deal with.

As with all phishing emails, two things can happen if you click on the link provided or call the number provided to dispute the charge.  Either you will be sent to a legitimate looking, but phony webpage where you will be prompted to input personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or, even worse, merely by clicking on the link, you will download malware such as keystroke logging malware that will steal all of your personal information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.  If you receive an email like this and think it may possibly be legitimate, merely call PayPal, your bank or other institution from which the email purports to originate at a telephone number that you know is accurate and you will be able to confirm that it is a scam.  The phone number in the email is not the phone number of PayPal which is 402-935-7733.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – April 28, 2021 – FTC Sending Refunds to Victims of Phantom Debt Collector

Receiving a telephone call from a debt collector is not a pleasant experience. Being hounded by someone attempting to collect a debt you do not owe is fraud. I have written many times in the past about scammers who use deceptive and abusive collections practices in attempting to collect non-existent debts.  These scammers violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act by making threatening and verbally abusive phone calls, contacting third parties about the  phony debts, threatening legal action and attempting to collect debts that the scammers knew were not owed.  Last year, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) initiated Operation Corrupt Collector a joint action by the FTC and state authorities to shut down illegal debt collectors.  Last year the FTC  brought charges against numerous debt collection scammers including two companies that robocalls to threaten lawsuits if the people they called did not pay non-existent debts.  In these cases the companies falsely claimed either to be law enforcement officers or attorneys threatening their victims with arrest and imprisonment as well as the loss of their drivers licenses.

Now the Federal Trade Commission and the Illinois Attorney General are refunding millions of dollars to victims of a phantom debt scheme operated by scammers using the names Stark Law, Stark Recovery, Capital Harris Miller and CHM Capital Group.  The scammers preyed upon people who had applied for short term loans, pressuring them into paying debts that they either did no owe or that the scammers did not have the authority to collect, threatening their victims with lawsuits or arrest.

TIPS

Subject to strict federal laws, legitimate debt collectors are permitted to call debtors, however, the law prohibits them from threatening imprisonment for the failure to pay a debt and attempting to collect a debt that the debt collector knows is bogus.  It can be difficult to know when someone calls attempting to collect a debt if indeed they are legitimate or not, so your best course of action if you receive such a call is to not discuss the debt with the person calling, but instead demand that they send you a written “validation notice” by regular mail which describes the debt they allege you owe and includes a listing of your rights under the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.  Never give personal information over the phone to anyone who calls you attempting to collect a debt. You can never be sure who they are. You also can check your credit report at each of the three credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion to see if any debts which you are not aware of appear on your credit reports.  If you receive the validation notice and it appears to be legitimate, you may be better off contacting your creditor directly because the person who called you may not be representing the creditor, but may merely have information about the debt.

For more information about this refund program, click on the FTC Scam Refunds tab in the middle of the first page of http://www.scamicide.com. There are no fees involved with receiving a refund through this program. Anyone contacting you about this refund program who demands a fee or payment of any kind is a scammer.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – April 27, 2021 – MacKenzie Scott Is Not Sending You Money

Of all the scams I have written about in the ten years that I have been writing Scamicide.com, one that continually ensnares people is phony gifts from Mavis Wanczk.   Many of you may not remember the name of Mavis Wanczyk, but she was the lucky winner of a 758 million dollar Powerball drawing in 2017. Not long after she claimed her prize, a scam started appearing in which many people received emails with the message line referring to the Mavis  Wanczyk Cash Grant. The email indicated that you were chosen to receive a large cash grant from Mavis  Wanczyk. All the lucky strangers receiving the emails had to do was provide personal information in order to qualify for the grant. In addition, phony social media accounts on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram were also set up in Ms. Wanczyk’s name through which people were contacted with the same phony offer of free money informing them that in order to qualify for the grant they merely needed to provide personal information.  These Mavis Wanczyk scams continue to proliferate and hardly a week goes by that I don’t receive questions from Scamicide readers and others about these.

Many of you may not be familiar with the name MacKenzie Scott, but she is the extremely wealthy woman who is best known as both being the ex-wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos as well as being one of the most philanthropic people on the planet.  In 2020 alone, she gave away almost six billion dollars to universities, food banks and other charities, however, she does not give money away to individual people.  This, however,  has not stopped scammers from using her name to scam people into thinking that Ms. Scott is contacting them to tell them that she has chosen them to receive some of her wealth.  The scam begins with an email that appears to come from Ms. Scott telling the “lucky” intended victim that he or she has been chosen to receive a substantial gift from Ms. Scott.  The emails and the scams are quite sophisticated and often show a bank account in the name of the targeted victim.  All the victim needs to do to gain access to the funds is pay some associated fees, which the scammer requires be paid through Bitcoin.  Of course, the entire setup is  scam.  There is no money for the victim and the funds transferred to the scammers through Bitcoin are lost forever.

TIPS

This scam is even more insidious than those using the name of Mavis Wanczyk because some of the victims have Googled MacKenzie Scott and found legitimate stories indicating that she is giving and has given away billions of dollars.  What these people fail to notice is that Ms. Scott is not and has not given money away to individuals, but only to institutions.    Whenever you receive an email offering you substantial amounts of money that you have never asked for you should remember one of my mottos “B.S. – Be Skeptical.”  No one is contacting strangers to give money to them.  Also, paying any fee by Bitcoin, gift card or wired funds should always be something about which you are skeptical because these methods of payment are favored by scammers because they are impossible to stop or trace.  Making this problem even worse is that many of the victims of this scam have had their names provided to other scammers who contact them with similar scams.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was recently cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

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