Scam of the Day

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Scam of the day – March 2, 2021 – FTC Sending Refunds to Victims of Tech Support Scam

Tech support scams are a profitable way for scammers to steal your money.  I have been warning you about these scams for years.  They come in a number of different varieties including pop up ads on your computer and telephone calls purportedly from Microsoft, Apple, Google or other tech companies.  In 2015 I told you that  the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) along with the Attorneys General of Pennsylvania and Connecticut  filed legal action against a company, Click4Support which the FTC alleged stole more than 17 million dollars from unwary consumers by pretending that they represented Microsoft, Apple and others offering unneeded tech support services. That case was settled and the FTC sent a first round of refund checks to victims of the scam a year ago.  However, the FTC is now sending a second round of refund checks to victims of the scam.  For more information about this refund program, click on the FTC Scam Refunds tab in the middle of the first page of http://www.scamicide.com.

Click4Support used online advertisements and popups that made them appear to be a part of Microsoft or Apple.  The ads would lure unsuspecting computer users to call Click4Support and then give Click4Support remote access to the victims’ computers for purposes of identifying viruses, malware and other problems, which were always found whether or not they actually existed.  Then Click4Support sold its services either on a one time basis or a long-term service plan at a cost that ranged from $69 to thousands.  In return, the victims actually got nothing of value and, in some instances, their computers were harmed.

TIPS

In the phone scams for tech support, it is important to remember that neither Microsoft nor Apple will ever call you about tech support so if someone represents that they are doing just that, it is a scam.  Hang up the phone.  Don’t trust popup ads for tech support service either.  If you have any concerns about your computer’s security contact a reputable computer security company using a telephone number that you have confirmed is legitimate.

Whenever you get a pop-up, email, or text message that appears to tell you that you have a security problem with your computer, you should never click on any links contained in the message or call the telephone number provided. If your screen becomes frozen, all you need to do is just turn off your computer and restart it. If you are concerned that you may be experiencing a real security problem you can contact tech support at Apple or Microsoft directly by phone or by email using the phone number and email addresses you find on their respective websites.

Providing remote access to anyone to your computer can lead to a myriad of problems including identity theft and the downloading of ransomware.  Neither Apple nor Microsoft or any of the other tech companies ever provide notices of security problems that contain telephone numbers for you to call to fix the problem.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – March 1, 2021 – Beware of Phony Covid-19 Vaccine Websites

The number of people being vaccinated  against the Coronvarius continues to increase.   However, according to the New York Times only 6.2% of the population are fully vaccinated and only 14% of the population have received one shot.  Many people are finding it very difficult to go through the usual channels to get their highly desired Covid -19 vaccination shots and so, in their desperation they are turning to the Internet and often are ending up on counterfeit websites that appear to be those of legitimate pharmaceutical companies such as Moderna.  Here is a screen shot of such a phony website taken by the Department of Justice.

This particular phony Moderna website offered vaccines that could be purchased online for $30 per dose.  Often the cost is more.  Sometimes you receive nothing except a lesson in how to lose your money.  Other times you may actually receive something, but whatever you get is not a real vaccine that will not protect you from the Coronavirus and could potentially be dangerous to your health.

The Department of Homeland Security had identified as many as 80,000 phony websites related to the Coronavirus and has already recovered 33 million dollars paid to some of these scammers.

TIPS

First and foremost, it is important to know that you cannot purchase Covid-19 vaccines online so any website offering you the vaccine, even if the website appears to be that of Moderna, Pfizer or Johnson & Johnson for example is a scam. Sophisticated scammers often are able to manipulate the algorithms used by Google and other search engines so that their phony website appear high on any search engine search you might do.

For information you can trust in regard to obtaining the Covid-19 vaccine, go to the website of the CDC  and click on the section entitled “How do I get a Vaccine” to learn how to get the vaccine in your particular state.  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/index.html

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 28, 2021 – How Serious a Problem is Deed Fraud?

Recently the New York Attorney General announced a grant of $800,000 to a program to help protect homeowners from a variety of scams threatening them including deed fraud.  Deed fraud, which is also referred to as “property title theft” occurs when a criminal files a counterfeit deed to property owned by someone else and then either lives in the property or even sells the property to an unwary buyer.  Deed fraud most commonly occurs after a homeowner dies.  Enterprising criminals monitor the obituaries looking for homes owned by people recently deceased and then forge a deed to the property and record it in the local Registry of Deeds.

Indications that a home you may own has been subject to deed fraud often comes when you receive notices for unpaid real estate tax, water or mortgage bills.  Ironically, another indication of deed fraud is when you own a home and don’t receive your real estate tax bill because the scammer has changed the address to which the real estate tax bill is sent to cover his or her tracks.  Receiving a foreclosure notice when you don’t even have a mortgage is another indication that you have become a victim of deed fraud after the criminal has mortgaged your home by forging your signature.

Resolving deed fraud can be a timely process, but it is one that you will eventually be able to do successfully.

TIPS

In order to protect yourself from deed fraud you should regularly monitor your credit reports at each of the three major credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion and be on the lookout for bills related to your property.  Monitoring your credit report is something we all should do regularly anyway. In response to the Coronavirus pandemic, through April 20, 2021, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax will offer all U.S. consumers free weekly credit reports through AnnualCreditReport.com.

It also is helpful to regularly check with your local Registry of Deeds to confirm that no one has filed a forged deed to your property.  Most people can access their local Registry of Deeds online for free.

Finally, when you purchase your home, you are offered the option of buying an owner’s title insurance policy which will cover the cost of remedying deed fraud.  An owner’s title insurance policy is a good choice for any homeowner for a variety of reasons.  Lately I have seen and heard advertisements for special insurance that only covers deed fraud although generally all these policies offer is monitoring the Registry of Deeds for filings that relate to your home, which is something that you can do on your own quite simply for free.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 27, 2021 – Free Netflix Scam

For a long time I have warned you that the popularity of Netflix, particularly during the Coronavirus pandemic,  makes it a preferred subject for phishing emails and phishing text messages, which are referred to as smishing.  Smishing is the name given to text messages that lure you into clicking on links or providing personal information in response to a text message from what appears to be a trusted source, such as a company with which you do business.

Recently I was contacted by Holland Cooke, a Scamicide reader and the host of the RT America show “The Big Picture” that he received a text message that read “Due to the pandemic, Netflix is giving everyone a free 1-year subscription to help you stay at home.  Get yours here” and then it provided a link to click on to purportedly sign up for your free Netflix subscription.  Clicking on the link would take you to an official appearing, but totally bogus Netflix website where you are prompted to provide personal information including credit card information in order to receive your “free” subscription.  A red flag as to this being a scam is the request for credit card or debit card information if you are supposed to be signing up for a “free” year of Netflix. Once you have turned over that information to the scammer, you can expect within minutes that your credit card will be used for fraudulent purchases.

With the social isolation that has become the hallmark of the Coronavirus pandemic, many of us, myself included, have been watching a lot of Netflix programming and this has increased the motivation of scammers to set up many phony Netflix websites to which they lure people through emails and text messages to go to under the guise of a variety of  phony reasons, such as needing to update your information or confirm information.  Of course, the real purpose of these phony Netflix websites and the phishing emails and text messages sent to you is to lure you into going to these phony Netflix websites to trick you into providing your credit card information.

TIPS

As I always say, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  You can never be truly sure when you receive an email seeking personal information such as your credit card number whether or not the email is a scam.  The risk of clicking on a link or providing the requested information is just too high. Instead, if you think that the email might be legitimate, you should contact the company at a telephone number that you know is legitimate and find out whether or not the email or text message was a scam.

Netflix will never ask in an email or text message for any of your personal information so anytime you get an email or text message purportedly from Netflix asking for your credit card number, Social Security number or any other personal information, it is a scam.  Here is a link to Netflix’s security page for information about staying secure in regard to your Netflix account. https://help.netflix.com/en/node/13243

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 26, 2021 – Insights in New Phishing Study

Google recently released a new study that it did in conjunction with researchers at Stanford University in which it studied more than a billion malicious emails targeting gmail users.  The study has a number of interesting points that can help us all protect ourselves from phishing and spear phishing emails.  Phishing and the more specifically tailored and targeted spear phishing emails are the primary way that malware is delivered, data breaches are accomplished and many scams originate.  These legitimate appearing phishing and spear phishing emails most commonly lure victims into either providing personal information that is used to make you a victim of identity theft or to click on links infected with malware such as ransomware or keystroke logging malware that can enable the hacker to go through your computer or phone for information that can be used to make you a victim of identity theft.

The study found how massive the threat of phishing and spear phishing emails are with the number of phishing emails totalling more than a hundred million each day.  During the pandemic, at its peak, the number of phishing and spear phishing emails related to the Coronavirus pandemic reached as high as 18 million in a single day.

The study also found the United States was the country most targeted by phishing and spear phishing emails, followed by the United Kingdom and Japan although Australians are actually twice as likely to be targeted by a phishing or spear phishing attack than people in the United States when you consider their relative population size.  According to the study, people between the ages of 55 and 64 are 1.64 times more likely to be targeted by these attacks than people between the ages of 18 and 24.  Most significantly, the study found that if your personal information was compromised in a data breach, your are five times more likely to be targeted by a phishing or spear phishing attack and with data breaches reaching record levels during the Coronavirus pandemic, this is bad news for many people.

So what can you do to protect yourself?

TIPS

First and foremost you should remember my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  Whenever you get an email requesting personal information or asking you to click on a link, you should be skeptical.  You can never be sure who is actually contacting you.  The first thing you should do is check the email address of the sender.  Often phishing and spear phishing emails are sent in large number by criminals using botnets which are networks of  hacked and infected computers used by cybercriminals to send out phishing emails in a manner that cannot readily be traced back to them.  However, if you get a phishing email that appears to come from Netflix for example and the email address of the sender is that of a individual person, you can be confident that the email is a phishing email and you should ignore it and delete it.

Even if the email address of the sender appears to be legitimate, sophisticated cybercriminals can make the email address appear to be that of a legitimate source.  Still you shouldn’t trust it, but rather should absolutely confirm any email that asks for personal information or for you to click on a link that it is legitimate.

You should also use strong security software on all of your electronic devices including your phone and computer, however, you should not rely on these to be foolproof.  Never underestimate the power of a fool or a cybercriminal.  Even if you keep your security software updated with the latest security patches as soon as they are made available (which is very important to do), the latest versions of malware are always at least a month ahead of the security software companies.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 25, 2021 – Clubhouse App Hacked

Clubhouse is a social networking app used by millions of people, including Tesla founder Elon Muska and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, providing chat rooms to discuss a wide variety of topics.  Unlike some other social media, Clubhouse only involves audio with no text, videos or photographs.  Clubhouse is only available for iPhones and iPads and presently you must be invited to be able to join and use Clubhouse…. unless you are a hacker.  Recently Clubhouse revealed that its chats had been hacked.  Barely a week after Clubhouse had indiicated that it had improved its security, it was hacked and multiple chat rooms’ audio feeds were stolen and posted online.

TIPS

The hacking of Clubhouse is a cautionary tale for any users of the app to make sure that they do not share any personal informaiton on Clubhouse that they would want to maintain private and secure.  It is also interesting to note that if you read the fine print in Clubhouse’s privacy policy (which few do) you will find, “we cannot and do not guarantee that Content you or any users post on the Services will not be viewed by unauthorized persons.”  It is always a good idea to refrain from posting sensitive personal information on any social media.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 24, 2021 – Coronavirus Vaccine Scams

While the rate of infections have recently gone down somewhat, the Coronavirus continues to ravage the United States, where fatalities have reached 500,000, as well as the rest of the world.  Fortunately, vaccinations are happening although getting an appointment for a vaccine shot in much of the country is difficult and confusing.  Of course, scammers are only too willing to take advantage of this situation and they are contacting people by phone, email and text messages with a variety of scams intended to steal your money or get information from you that they will use to make you a victim of identity theft.

Scammers are calling people posing as a legitimate public health organization in an effort to lure people into paying to be placed on an expedited list to receive the vaccine.  Even if the call you receive offering you a dose of the vaccine appears on your Caller ID to have come from the CDC or some other legitimate source it is not to be trusted.  Using a technique called spoofing your Caller ID can be manipulated by the scammer to make the call appear to come from a legitimate source when, in fact, it is coming from a scammer.  These scammers will ask for your name, address, Social Security number, Medicare number and even, in some instances, your bank account information or credit card information.  In some instances, the scam victim is asked to pay a fee to receive priority in the distribution of the vaccine.

Scammers posing as Medicare workers are also calling seniors offering in-home vaccinations.  They then ask for your Medicare number which, although it is no longer your Social Security number, can still lead to Medicare fraud and identity theft.

TIPS

The truth is that you do not need to provide your Social Security number or credit card number to anyone when signing up for a Coronavirus vaccine appointment and there are no expedited lists to receive the vaccine which you can get put on by paying a fee.  There are no fees involved in getting your Coronavirus vaccine shot.

Be particularly wary of advertisements for Coronavirus vaccines appearing on social media.  They are filled with scams.  Only deal with official vaccine distribution centers.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 23, 2021 – Kroger Suffers Data Breach

We learned a few days ago that the grocery and pharmacy chain Kroger had suffered a data breach of which it first became aware on January 23rd, but did not notify its customers of the breach until a few days ago.  In a statement released on February 19th, Kroger indicated that it believes fewer than 1% of its customers were affected.  Those affected were primarily users of its Health and Money Services along with current and former employees whose personnel records were compromised.  Kroger also said that the data breach did not reach its stores’ IT systems or grocery store systems.  Kroger indicated that it will be contacting those people affected by the data breach and are offering them free credit monitoring.

The Kroger data breach was not limited to Kroger, but was accomplished through the hacking of a third-party vendor, Accellion a company that produces file transfer software used for sharing large amounts of data and substantial email attachments that was used by Kroger and many other companies who also have been compromised.   Cybercriminals often use the information gathered in data breaches to form the basis of scams that start with spear phishing emails which are phishing emails specifically tailored with information about you and your interests. These spear phishing emails will attempt to lure you into either providing personal information that can be used to make you a victim of identity theft or to click on links containing harmful malware.  In other instances, the hackers will gather sensitive information such as Social Security numbers that may be obtained through data breaches to directly steal the identities of the victims of the data breach.

TIPS

This data breach is another reminder that you are only as secure as the websites with the weakest security that have your personal information.  As for protecting yourself from spear phishing emails, everyone should be skeptical of any email asking for personal information or prompting you to click on a link. Never provide such information or click on links until you have confirmed that the email is legitimate.

I also urge you to regularly go to the website https://haveibeenpwned.com/ where you can insert your email address and find what data breaches may have compromised your information.

Data breaches also can serve as a reminder to everyone that if you have not already frozen your credit reports at the three major credit reporting bureaus, you should do so now.  Freezing your credit reports is the single best thing you can do to protect yourself from becoming a victim of identity theft.   Here are links to each of the credit bureaus with instructions about how to get a credit freeze:

https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp
https://www.transunion.com/credit-freeze/place-credit-freeze
https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html

Once you have frozen your credit, be sure to keep the PIN and information on how to unfreeze your credit report in a safe place

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – Feberuary 22, 2021 – Winter Storm Scams

Natural disasters, such as the recent snow and ice storms in Texas, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Missouri  have caused severe hardship to many people.  Natural disasters such as this bring out the best in people who want to donate to charities to help the victims. Unfortunately natural disasters also bring out the worst in scammers who are quick to take advantage of the generosity of people by contacting them posing as charities, but instead of collecting funds to help the victims of the storms these scam artists steal the money for themselves.

Charities are not subject to the federal Do Not Call List so even if you are enrolled in the Do Not Call List, legitimate charities are able to contact you. The problem is that whenever you are contacted on the phone, you can never be sure as to who is really calling you so you may be contacted either by a phony charity or a scammer posing as a legitimate charity. Similarly, when you are solicited for a charitable contribution by email or text message you cannot be sure as to whether the person contacting you is legitimate or not.

TIPS

Never provide credit card information over the phone to anyone whom you have not called or in response to an email or text message. Before you give to any charity, you may wish to check out the charity with http://www.charitynavigator.org where you can learn whether or not the charity itself is a scam. You can also see how much of the money that the charity collects actually goes toward its charitable purposes and how much it uses for fund raising and administrative costs.  Charity Navigator has a listing of specific charities that it has vetted that are good choices for anyone wishing to help the victims of these winter storms.  Among the highest rated charities helping victims of the winter storms are Americares, Direct Relief and Family Promise.  For a full list of vetted charities you may wish to consider go to charitynavigator.org’s special page for Winter storm charities. https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=content.view&cpid=8555  You can also find information about how to make your donation at charitynavigator.org.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – February 21, 2021 – College Students’ Nude Photos Posted by Hackers

Two graduates of the State University of New York (SUNY) Plattsburgh, Nicholas Faber and Michael Patrick Fish have pleaded guilty to computer fraud and aggravated identity theft charges related to their their hacking into online accounts of 79 students at SUNY Plattsburgh and then trading those photos and videos with other hackers on the Dark Web, that part of the Internet where criminals buy and sell goods and services.  Hacking into online accounts of women and stealing nude photos and videos has been a problem for years, most notably when hackers stole nude photos form the iCLoud accounts of a number of celebrities including Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton.

In this case, Faber and Fish first hacked into the email accounts of their victims and from there gathered information including the passwords of their victims’ Snapchat, Instagram and iCloud accounts from which they were able to steal the compromising photos and videos.  It appears that the hackers were able to hack into the accounts by sending spear phishing emails that lured their victims into providing their passwords or clicking on links that downloaded keystroke logging malware that would enable the hackers to gather the passwords from their victims’ computers and phones.

Faber and Fish will be sentenced later this year.

TIPS

There are a number of lessons to be learned from this crime about how to protect our own security.    It is important to resist providing your username and passwords in response to emails and text messages unless you have absolutely and independently confirmed that the request is legitimate. You also shouldn’t click on links in emails and text messages regardless of how legitimate they may appear unless you have absolutely confirmed that the communication is legitimate.  The risk of downloading malware is too great.

The first step in protecting your privacy is using a strong and unique password for each of your online accounts.  For information about how to pick a strong password, you can go to the archives of Scamicide.com and type in “strong password.”  You also can use a password manager.

In addition, at least one of the victims of Faber and Fish had her email password changed by the hackers.  This is generally accomplished when someone answers your security question and becomes able to change your password.  Enterprising hackers are able to change passwords of their intended victims by answering a security question which then enables them to change the victim’s password and take over the account.  This was what happened years ago to Sarah Palin when a hacker answered the security question for her email account and was able to change the password and take over the account.  Her question was where did she meet her husband and the answer was Wasilla High School which was found by the hacker by going to Sarah Palin’s Wikipedia page.  You may think that you are not famous and that information to answer your security question is not readily available, but you might be surprised by both how much personal information you and others post about you on social media that could be used to provide the answers to you security questions as well as the wide array of information about you that is available online such as your mother’s maiden name which is a common security question.  The solution to this problem is simple.  When you initially set up your security question, use a nonsensical answer.  Thus the answer to your mother’s maiden name question could be “firetruck.”  It is silly enough for you to remember and no hacker will ever be able to guess it.  You should also use dual factor authentication whenever possible to provide a much greater level of protection even if your password is compromised, such as through a data breach.

Also, take advantage of the dual-factor authentication protocols.  With dual-factor authentication, your password is only the starting point for accessing your account.  After you have put in your password, the site you are attempting to access will send a special one-time code to your cellphone for you to use to be able to access your account.  In some instances, the companies will only send the code to you if your account is being accessed from a different device than you usually use to access your accounts.  Had the victims of Faber and Fish used dual-factor authentication, they would still have their privacy.

It is also important to note that merely because you think you have deleted a photograph or video from your cellphone, that may not be accurate. Cellphones save deleted photographs and videos on their cloud servers such as the Google+service for Android phones and the iCloud for iPhones.  However, you can change the settings on your cellphone to prevent your photos from automatically being preserved in the cloud.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

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