Scam of the Day

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Scam of the day – January 25, 2022 – Pornhub Premium Service Bill Scam

The phony invoice scam is a common scam popular with scammers because it is quite effective.  It starts when you receive an email that purports to be from a popular company with which many of us do business that indicates that you owe them a significant payment.   The scammers count on people being concerned that they are being wrongfully charged for a product they did not order.  You are provided a telephone number to call if you dispute the bill. If you call the number, you will be prompted to provide personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft.

The copied email below, which was sent to me by a Scamicide reader, appears to come from PayPal  in regard to a payment for premium services at Pornhub which is the largest adult website on the Internet and which claims it had 42 billion visits last year.   As always, the purpose of a phishing email is to lure you into clicking on links contained within the email or providing personal information, in this case by phone if you call to dispute the phony bill . If you click on links in phishing emails, you end up downloading malware and if you provide the requested information, it ends up being used to make you a victim of identity theft. This particular phishing email provides a phone number to call if you wish to dispute the obviously phony invoice.  If you call the number in the phishing email you will be asked for personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft.  The phone number is not that of PayPal.

It is very easy to counterfeit the logo of PayPal or any other company so merely because the invoice looks legitimate is no reason to trust it.  B.S. – Be skeptical.

Here is a copy of the invoice being circulated.  I have blocked out the name of the Scamicide reader and his address.

INVOICE NO. 22181412 DETAILS
Paypal Inc
USD 699.99
Print or save
Powered by QuickBooks
Dear XXXXXXXXXXX,

We appreciate your business. Thank You for Making Your Online Purchase from PORN HUB INC using your Paypal Account. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.
Have a great day!
Paypal Inc
Toll Free Number : +1 (800) 958-2315
Date: January 08, 2022
Bill to
XXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXX
Terms
Automated Payment via Paypal Account
08/01/2022
Online Membership – Subscription
USD 699.99
1 Year – Porn Hub – Premium HD Videos – Membership
1 X USD 699.99
Balance due USD 699.99
Print or save
Paypal Inc
2211 N 1st St, San Jose, CA 95131
800-958-2315
If you receive an email that seems fraudulent, please check with the business owner before paying.
© Intuit, Inc. All rights reserved.

TIPS

Once, I received a large invoice from a company with which I do business for goods I did not order, but rather than click on the link provided in the email, I went directly to the company’s website to question the invoice.  When the website came up, the first thing I saw was a large announcement that the invoice was a scam and that many people had received these phony invoices.  If you ever receive a phony invoice such as this and you think that it may possibly be true, don’t click on links or call phone numbers provided in the email.  Rather, contact the real company directly at a phone number or website that you know is legitimate where you can confirm that the phishing invoice was a scam.

Never click on links or download attachments in emails or text messages unless you have absolutely confirmed that they are legitimate and don’t call companies at telephone numbers that appear in the email such as this one.  Instead, if the email appears to come from a legitimate company, you can call them at a telephone number you confirm is legitimate .  Don’t call the number that appears in the email.

One firm indication that this is a scam is that in the last year Mastercard, Visa and Paypal all stopped doing business with Pornhub over allegations of illegal videos appearing on the site.  Therefore, the phony invoice could not be legitimate.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – January 24, 2022 – AOL Phishing Email

Today’s Scam of the day is about a phishing email presently circulating that attempts to lure you into clicking on a link in order to continue using your AOL account.  Millions of people still use AOL. One reason for this is that you get greater email privacy when compared to some other email carriers. Due to its popularity, scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.   If you click on the link in the email where it reads “CLICK HERE TO VERIFY NOW” one of two things can occur and both are bad.  Either you will end up providing personal information to an identity thief or you will, merely by clicking on the link, download dangerous malware such as ransomware on to your phone, computer or other device.

Here is the email presently being circulated.  The link where it reads “CLICK HERE TO VERIFY NOW ” has been disabled.  If you had hovered your mouse over the original link, you would have seen that it would have taken you to a site that wasn’t related to AOL.

From: gsvdjcgsdjvh@gmail.com
To:
Sent: 1/20/2022 5:45:14 AM Pacific Standard Time
Subject: Customer service

AOL Mail

Password for your account  *********@aol.com   will expire today  Thursday, 20 January 2022
Your email account is currently undergoing an annual upgrade
To avoid account shut down Please verify your email below to complete this upgrade

CLICK HERE TO VERIFY NOW

Privacy  |   Copyright © AOL Inc, 2022. All rights  reserved

TIPS

When AOL communicates with its customers about their accounts, they do so by AOL Certified Mail, which will appear as a blue envelope in your inbox and will have an official AOL Mail seal on the border of the email.   No official AOL Mail seal appears in the inbox for this phishing email.     Whenever you get an email, you cannot be sure who is really sending it.   In the case of this email, the email address of the sender had no relation to AOL and may have been the email address of someone whose email account was hacked and made a part of a botnet of computers used by cybercriminals to send such communications.  In any event, it is glaringly obvious that the email address of the sender has absolutely no relation to AOL.

Never click on a link unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate.  If you think the email might be legitimate, the best thing to do is to contact the real company that the email purports to be from at an email address or phone number that you know is accurate in order to find out if the communication was legitimate or not.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide has been cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address where it states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 23, 2022 – Mail Forwarding Scams Increasing

I have warned you a number of times in the past about the danger of identity theft that occurs when criminals steal your mail from your mailbox.  Among the dangers of mail theft are criminals gathering personal information contained in your mail to set up accounts in your name or getting your credit card bill and using the information in your bill to access your credit card.  However, sometimes the criminals don’t even have to steal your mail, they can get the United States Postal Service USPS) to deliver your mail directly to the criminal by submitting a change of address form with the post office on your behalf either in person or online that results in your mail being sent directly to the criminal.

One of the ways that the Postal Service tries to prevent this type of fraud is by sending a letter to your old address confirming that you wanted your mail sent to a new address, however, this can be circumvented by clever scammers who merely submit a form to the post office on your behalf to hold your mail, as many people do when they are on vacation, which enables the scammer to get extra time before the scam is discovered.  Other times, the identity thieves will steal the notice from your mail knowing it is coming.

Recently Jill Gallipeau of Rochester, New York fell victim to this scam when a scammer filed a change of address with her local post office and then applied for a credit card through her bank, Bank of America.  Fortunately, before sending the card, Bank of America sent her a confirming email which alerted her to the fraud and she was able to contact the bank to stop the issuance of the card.  A few days later the change of address confirmation letter was delivered to her and she was able to recognize how the fraud was attempted.  The USPS says that it has systems to protect customers against unauthorized address changes, but those systems are woefully inadequate.

TIPS

Certainly if you get a notice that a change of address form has been filed on your behalf and you have not filed such a form, you should contact the United States Postal Service immediately.  Also, if you fail to receive any mail whatsoever for a couple of days, it is important to contact the post office to make sure that no one has changed your address.  Remember, even paranoids have enemies.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 22, 2022 – Critical Google Chrome Security Updates

As was made abundantly clear by 2017’s  massive Equifax data breach which affected 148 million people and was perpetrated by hackers exploiting a  vulnerability in Apache software for which Apache had already issued a security update, but Equifax failed to install,  constant updating of the software we all use with the latest security patches and updates is a critical part of avoiding scams and identity theft threats.

When new security updates and patches are issued, we provide access to these so that you can update your software to provide better security on your computers, cell phones, laptops and other electronic devices.  Updating your software with the latest security patches and updates as soon as possible is important because identity thieves and scammers are always finding and exploiting vulnerabilities in the software that we all use.  Delay in updating your software could lead to disastrous results.  However, it is also important to be sure that you are downloading legitimate patches and updates rather than being tricked by an identity thief or scammer into downloading malware under the guise of downloading a security patch or update.

Today’s security update corrects 26 critical vulnerabilities in the popular search engine Google Chrome.  It is important to remember that while Google will automatically send your computer the updates as soon as they are issued, you need to restart your browser to install the updates.  Some people leave their browser open for days at a time so it is important to download and install any Google Chrome security updates as soon as they are available.

TIPS

Here is a  link to this recent security update as posted by the Department of Homeland Security: https://www.cisa.gov/uscert/ncas/current-activity/2022/01/20/google-releases-security-updates-chrome

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive  free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – January 21, 2022 – FTC Refunding More Money to Victims of Debt Relief Scam

Being in debt is a difficult situation faced by many people. Unfortunately, it can be made much worse when debtors are targeted by unscrupulous scammers posing as debt relief specialists  who steal from the people in debt.  In the Scam of the day for July 18, 2020 I told you that the FTC and the Florida Attorney General had settled their lawsuit against an organization called the Helping America Group that got people to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars a month by falsely promising to pay, settle, or obtain dismissal of their debts and improve their credit scores. Over time, victims found their debts unpaid, their accounts in default, and their credit scores severely damaged.  Some were sued by their creditors, and others were forced into bankruptcy.  In the July 18, 2020 Scam of the day I informed you that the FTC was sending more than 16 million dollars to victims of the scam.  Now the FTC is sending a second round of checks to people who lost money to this scam because the FTC was able to recover an additional 6.5 million dollars from the Helping America Group to reimburse victims of the scam.

If you were a victim of this scam and need information about getting your payment from the FTC go to the FTC Refund tab in the middle of the first page of Scamicide.com

TIPS

There are many debt relief companies that may be able to help people with debt problems, however, credit counseling services may be a better and more economical choice for many people.  While there are legitimate debt relief companies, there also are many scammers who will take your money and provide little, if anything, for your payment.  Again, it is important to remember that it is illegal for a debt relief company to charge you a fee prior to settling your debts.  If you are considering using a debt relief company, you should check with your state’s Attorney General and your state’s consumer protection agency to see if there are any consumer complaints against them.  Finally, for detailed information about alternatives to consider if you are having debt problems, go to the FTC’s website at https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0153-choosing-credit-counselor

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 20, 2022 – Watch Out for Free Covid-19 Test Kit Scams

Scamicide has often been among the very first to report about new scams, but generally we report on them as they first occur.  Today however, we are warning you about a scam that we are confident will be happening, but has not yet been reported.  The federal government has just launched its website where you can sign up for free Covid-19 tests.  With an average of 777.453 new Covid-19 cases and 1,797 new deaths each day, according to Johns Hopkins University, many of us are concerned about the disease and home testing is a major part of the strategy to combat the disease.

The Biden administration has pledged to initially distribute 500 million free rapid tests to Americans who use the new website or call a telephone hotline that is expected to be set up soon.  This is a very positive development for many people who have had difficulty obtaining home tests.  The scam will be coming when scammers start setting up phony websites that appear to be that of the official government website.  In these phony websites it can be expected that the scammers will ask for personal information, such as your Social Security number which they will use to make you a victim of identity theft.

The official website only asks for your name and mailing address. If you wish you can provide your email address to get updates on the shipment of the test kits, but providing your email address is not required.  Here is a link to the sign up page of the real website for ordering free test kits.  https://special.usps.com/testkits

TIPS

You can use the link above if you wish to order your free test kits and be sure that you are ordering from the official website and not that of a scammer.  Again, remember that you do not have to provide any other information other than your name and mailing address. Anyone or any website that requests more information for the free test kits now being provided by the federal government is a scammer.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 19, 2022 – Counterfeit Check Scam Snaring More Victims

Counterfeit check scams take many different forms, but their most common form is where you are provided a check, under a wide variety of pretenses, for more than you would be paid and asked to wire the difference back to the person giving you the check.  The check is counterfeit and after you deposit it into your bank account, it will ultimately bounce and be rejected, however, the money you wire from your bank account believing that the check was legitimate is gone forever with no recourse.

In one instance, a California woman received an unsolicited letter in the mail with a check made out to her in the amount of $4,900.  The letter appeared to come from the U.S. Postal Service and informed her that she had been chosen to participate in a survey evaluating the services of her local post office branch.  She was instructed to deposit the check and then use the money to buy four $1,000 money orders from her local post office and send the money orders to an address provided to her.  She was told that she could keep the remaining $900 as her compensation for performing these tasks. Of course, the check was counterfeit and ultimately bounced, but her own funds used to purchase the money orders was lost when the money orders were quickly cashed.

The check sent by the scammer looks legitimate. Unfortunately, the check is counterfeit. Often in these circumstances the check will appear to be a bank check or a certified check, but it is just a forgery.  While in the past it took considerable talent to create a legitimate appearing forged check, technology today enables even unsophisticated criminals to create forged checks that defy detection.  Sometimes, the victims of this scam will think they are being prudent by waiting a few days for the check to clear only to learn later that it can take weeks for a check to fully clear and the provisional credit that you are given by your bank after a few days does not mean that the check was legitimate. Once the check is discovered by the bank to be a forgery the provisional credit is taken away and the victim of the scam has lost the money he or she wired to the scammer from his or her bank account.

TIPS

Whenever you are paid for something  by a check for more than the amount that is due and the payment comes with a request for you to send the difference back to the sender, this is an indication of a scam.  Also, anytime you are paid by a check you should wait for the check to fully clear before considering it to be valid.  Even if the check appears to be a bank check or a certified check, it may well be a forgery so you should contact your bank to make sure that the check has fully cleared before you consider the payment to have been made.  Regardless of the excuse that may be given to you as to the reason for payment by way of a check for more than what is owed, you should be suspicious.  Finally, always be wary when someone requires you to send a payment wired by Western Union or wired from your bank because once those payments have been made, it is impossible to get the money back.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 18, 2021 – Theft From USPS Mailboxes Increasing

Criminals around the country are increasingly stealing mail with checks in them from U.S. Postal Service mailboxes, “washing” the checks with simple nail polish remover to remove the name of the person or company to whom the check was made out and then writing in their own name.  In other instances, the criminals will also change the amount of the check.  In recent years Boston and New Orleans, for example, had large numbers of such mailbox thefts of checks that were then altered and cashed.  Identity theft is a high tech, low tech and no tech crime and while we often tend to focus our attention on high tech identity theft tactics such as spear phishing, no tech tactics such as fishing for mail with a plastic bottle covered in glue that is lowered into blue public mailboxes to capture mail being sent with checks is making a comeback.  In other instances criminals can either steal or buy a USPS mailbox key which are sold on the Dark Web, that part of the Internet where criminals buy and sell goods and services for as much as $1,000.  Some criminals, rather than use the “washed” checks themselves are now selling the checks on the Dark Web to other criminals directly. In addition, criminals can also can use the account number of your check to create counterfeit checks to access your checking account.

I have warned you for years about leaving mail with checks or credit card information in your personal mailbox outside of your home with the flag raised to alert your postal carrier that there is mail in your box to be retrieved is a bad idea because it also alerts identity thieves who can easily steal the mail.   However, mailing checks in official U.S. Postal Service blue mailboxes we now know is also problematic.

TIPS

This is an easy crime to avoid.  The best course of action is to pay your bills electronically and avoid the problem altogether.  However, if you cannot do so or prefer to send a paper check by mail, you should use a gel pen that is not easily “washed” to write your checks and you should mail envelopes with checks in them directly from inside the post office.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

Scam of the day – January 17, 2022 – Investors Losing Millions to “Pig Butchering Scam”

I have been warning you about romance scams for many years.  More recently I have been warning you for the last few years about the myriad of scams involving cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.  In the last couple of years a new scam combining the romance scam and cryptocurrency scams have surfaced with one victim in Colorado, Steve Belcher losing 1.6 million dollars.

Romance scams generally follow a familiar pattern with the scammers  establishing relationships with people, generally women, online through various legitimate dating websites and social media using fake names, locations and images.  The FBI has issued a warning about a new trend in romance scams in which the scammer tells his victim that he or she has inside knowledge about cryptocurrency investing and directs the victim to a phony website that purports to be a legitimate cryptocurrency trading site.  Not long after “investing” in the cryptocurrencies provided, the victim soon finds that there is no investment and that she or he has lost all of the invested money.  This scam originated in China in 2019 and is called sha zhu pan or pig butchering in English.  The name is derived from the practice of luring in victims, “fattening them up” by convincing them to continually “invest” more money and then stealing all of the money.

The scammers initially contact their victims on dating or social media apps and pretend to develop a close relationship.  After a while the scammer informs the targeted victim that he or she is making a lot of money investing in cryptocurrencies and suggests the victim download and use a cryptocurrency app used by the scammer.  Generally, the victims are lured into investing more and more money by what appears to be both dramatic increases in the value of their account and their ability to withdraw some of their profits.  However, once the victim has been persuaded to invest larger and larger sums of money, the scammers steal the money and the victim is left with nothing.

TIPS

It is important to remember that you should never  invest in something that you do not completely understand.  This was a mistake that many of Bernie Madoff’s victims made. Cryptocurrency scams quite often involve complicated language and investment terms that is purposefully unclear in an effort to confuse potential investors from understanding the real facts. You also may want to check out the SEC’s investor education website at www.investor.gov.  Scammers can be very convincing and it may sound like there is a great opportunity for someone to make some money, but you must be careful that the person making money is not the scam artist taking yours.

Also, the apps used in the pig butchering scam may appear to be legitimate, but they are not found on official app platforms such as Google Play or the Apple App Store.  Do your homework before investing in cryptocurrencies and only do business with well established cryptocurrency exchanges.  Never invest merely because of the recommendation of someone you may have met online.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is sign up for free using this link. https://scamicide.com/scam-of-the-day/

Scam of the day – January 16, 2022 – Interesting Takeaways from the FTC’s Biennial Report to Congress about the Do Not Call List

The Federal Trade Commission has issued it biennial report to Congress about the National Do Not Call list.  Since it began in 2003, the National Do Not Call list has grown to include  more than 244 million phone numbers.  When you register your phone number with the Do Not Call list it becomes illegal for telemarketers to contact you by phone.  The Do Not Call list does not apply to charities so you still may be contacted by charities even if you have registered for the Do Not Call list. However, when you receive a call from someone purporting to be representing a charity, you can never be sure who is really calling so you should never give your credit card number to someone who calls you allegedly from a charity. If you are interested in a particular charity, contact the charity directly to make your contribution.

According to the report the FTC received more than five million Do Not Call complaints in 2021 with most of those complaints dealing with robocalls as contrasted to live telemarketing.  Imposter scams where the scammer poses as a government employee of the IRS, Social Security Administration or some other governmental agency or of a legitimate company with which you do business were the most common complaints.  Other common complaints involved calls related to reducing debt and medical needs and prescriptions.

If you are registered for the Do Not Call list and you do receive a call from a telemarketer, you can be confident that the call is a scam because no legitimate telemarketer would call you if you are enrolled in the Do Not Call list. It is also important to note that while telemarketing is not in and of itself illegal, telemarketing through robocalls is always illegal.   Registering for the Do Not Call list will not stop robocalls. Illegal automated robocalls continue to be a major source of complaint for many people with the most common subjects of illegal robocalls being debt reduction, vacation and timeshares and warranty plans.  Last year Congress passed a law intended to reduce robocalls, but the legislation does not by any means stop robocalls entirely.

A scam that uses the Do Not Call list as the basis of the scam starts when you receive an email informing you that your registration in the Do Not Call list is expiring and that you have to register your phone number again. You are then directed to a phony website that gathers information that can be used for purposes of identity theft. The important thing to know is that you never have to reregister your phone number with the Do Not Call list. Once you have registered a number it is permanently on the Do Not Call list until the number is disconnected or you ask for your number to be removed.

TIPS
Registering for the do not call list is easy and free.  Merely go to http://www.donotcall.gov to register your phone number.

Here are some helpful tips for combatting robocalls.

Verizon has implemented new services to help its customers avoid illegal robocalls.  The new Call Filter service offers spam alerts and new protections from robocalls for its wireless customers.  Customers will receive alerts when a call is most likely a scam.  The new Call Filter service will also automatically block robocalls based of the customer’s preferred risk level.  The Call Filter service is offered in a free version and an enhanced version that among other things will enable customers to create a personal robocall block list.  For more information about the Call Filter Services and how to sign up go to https://www.verizonwireless.com/solutions-and-services/call-filter/

There are a number of other options for preventing robocalls including a number of apps that for free or a small fee will  reduce and in some instances prevent robocalls.
Samsung’s SmartCall informs you if the call you are receiving is from a known robocaller. This feature is available with newer Samsung Galaxy phones. Here is a link to information about SmartCall and instructions as to how to activate this app.
http://www.samsung.com/levant/apps/smart-call/

Google also has a spam blocker that will warn you when you are receiving a robocall and your screen will turn red. Here is a link to information about the app and how to install it.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.dialer&hl=en

AT&T also offers free apps to block robocalls on iPhones and Android phones. Here is a link to information about these apps.
https://www.att.com/features/security-apps.html?partner=LinkShare&siteId=TnL5HPStwNw-yrUS1uDw9WGvN._xt67yew&source=ECay0000000CEL00O

Verizon’s CallerName ID is a free service for iPhones and Android phones that will alert you to suspected robocallers. Here is a link to Verizon’s app.
https://www.verizonwireless.com/solutions-and-services/caller-name-id/

T-Mobile offers a free scam blocker of known robocallers for Android phones which you can activate by merely dialing #662#

Sprint offers a paid service to protect your iPhone or Android phone from robocalls. For more information, use this link
http://explore.t-mobile.com/callprotection

For landlines as well as smartphones there are a number of apps such as Nomorobo, Truecaller, Hiya, RoboKiller and YouMail that offer robocall blocking for free or for small monthly charges. Here is a link to those apps. I have used Nomorobo for years and find it to be tremendously useful

https://www.nomorobo.com/
https://www.truecaller.com/
https://hiya.com/
https://www.robokiller.com/
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.youmail.android.vvm&hl=en_US                                                                                                                                                                        https://www.youmail.com/home/apps

Finally, you can just choose to ignore any calls that come from numbers you do not recognize.   This is a good option.  If they are legitimate calls, they will leave a message and you can call them back.

For those of you receiving the Scam of the day through an email, I just want to remind you that if you want to see the ever increasing list of Coronavirus scams go to the first page of the http://www.scamicide.com website and click on the tab at the top of the page that indicates “Coronavirus Scams.”  Scamicide was cited by the New York Times as one of three top sources for information about Coronavirus related scams.

If you are not a subscriber to Scamicide.com and would like to receive free daily emails with the Scam of the day, all you need to do is to go to the bottom of the initial page of http://www.scamicide.com and type in your email address on the tab that states “Sign up for this blog.”

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