The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has just announced that it is mailing refund checks to the victims of a tech support scam perpetrated by Troth Solutions.  The funds for this refund are derived from a settlement between the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) the State of Alabama and Troth Solutions of charges Troth scammed people into believing their computers were infected with malware when the truth is that Troth was charging for unnecessary repairs.  Troth called intended victims and also used online ads that appeared to be security alerts from major tech companies to trick people into  giving the company remote access to their computers after which Troth would run what it called diagnostic tests which always found non-existent problems for which they charged their victims an average of $380 to repair. For more information about this refund program, click on the FTC Scam Refunds tab in the middle of the first page of www.scamicide.com.

TIPS
If you did business with Troth Solutions you may be eligible for a refund. It is important to note that you do not have to pay any administrative fee to claim your refund if you are eligible for a refund. Anyone asking for such a fee is just another scammer. Whenever you get a pop-up, email, or text message that appears to tell you that you have a security problem with your computer, you should never click on any links contained in the message or call the telephone number provided. If your screen gets frozen, all you need to do is just turn off your computer and restart it. If you are concerned that you may be experiencing a real security problem you can contact tech support at Apple or Microsoft directly by phone or by email using the phone number and email addresses you find on their respective websites.

Providing remote access to anyone to your computer can lead to a myriad of problems including identity theft and the downloading of ransomware.  Neither Apple nor Microsoft or any of the other tech companies ever provide notices of security problems that contain telephone numbers for you to call to fix the problem.  Whenever you get a pop-up, email, or text message that appears to tell you that you have a security problem with your computer, you should never click on any links contained in the message or call the telephone number provided. If your screen freezes, all you need to do is just turn off your computer and restart it. If you are concerned that you may be experiencing a real security problem you can contact tech support at the real tech companies directly by phone or by email using the phone number and email addresses you find on their respective websites.

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