Scam of the day – October 26, 2017 – Beware of Bad Rabbit ransomware

Ransomware is the name for malware that once installed on a computer, often unwittingly through clicking on links in spear phishing emails, encrypts and locks all of the victim’s data.  The cybercriminal then threatens to destroy the data unless a bounty is paid.  Earlier this year we  experienced two massive ransomware attacks against millions of computers around the world.  These were the infamous WannaCry and Peta ransomware attacks.  Now cybercriminals are launching a new strain of ransomware that carries the name “Bad Rabbit.”  Reproduced below is what appears on your screen if you become infected with the Bad Rabbit ransomware.  While to date the ransomware attacks using Bad Rabbit appear to be limited to Russia, Ukraine, Turkey and Germany, you can expect the use of Bad Rabbit to spread.

TIPS

According to security company Kaspersky Labs this ransomware attack was primarily launched when victims downloaded fake Adobe Flash programs from infected websites.  However, quite often ransomware attacks as well as other types of malware attacks are spread  through phishing emails that lure unsuspecting people into clicking on malware infected links or downloading attachments tainted with malware.  As I am constantly reminding you, never click on links or download attachments until you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

You also should update all of your electronic devices with the latest security updates and patches as soon as they become available, preferably automatically.  Many past ransomware attacks exploited vulnerabilities for which patches had already been issued.

As for protecting yourself specifically from ransomware, you should back up all of your data on at least two different platforms, such as in the Cloud and on a portable hard drive. Companies and agencies which can afford to do this, should also use Whitelisting software which prevents the installation of any unauthorized computer software programs.

Scam of the day – June 29, 2017 – Latest security updates from the Department of Homeland Security

As shown by the recent massive WannaCry  and Petya ransomware attacks that took advantage of computer users that had not patched their Windows operating system with available updates, constant updating of the software we all use with the latest security patches and updates is a critical part of avoiding scams and identity theft threats.  Whenever new security updates and patches are issued, we provide access to these so that you can update your software to provide better security on your computers, smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices.  Updating your software with the latest security patches and updates as soon as possible is important because identity thieves and scammers are always finding and exploiting vulnerabilities in the software that we all use.  Delay in updating your software could lead to disastrous results.  However, it is also important to be sure that you are downloading legitimate patches and updates rather than being tricked by an identity thief or scammer into downloading malware under the guise of downloading a security patch or update.  These new updates from the Department of Homeland Security includes critical updates for Adobe software including Adobe Flash.

I have been warning you for years about flaws in Adobe Flash that have been exploited by hackers and identity thieves against individuals, companies and government agencies including the U.S. State Department and the White House.  Problems with Adobe Flash are nothing new.  In 2010 Steve Jobs vociferously complained about its security and it has routinely been cited as being extremely vulnerable.  Despite security patch after security patch, new problems keep coming up.  According to security company, Symantec 80% of the newly discovered software vulnerabilities which can be exploited by malware created by cybercriminals involved Adobe Flash.

TIPS

Here are the links to a list of all of the recent security updates as posted by the Department of Homeland Security:

https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/bulletins/SB17-177

Some alternative plugins you may wish to consider to replace Adobe Flash include  GNU Gnash, and Silverlight.

Silverlight can be downloaded free directly from the Microsoft at this link: https://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/ while GNU Gnash can be downloaded free at this link: http://www.gnu.org/software/gnash/

Breaking news story – June 27, 2017 – Much of the world hit by another massive ransomware attack.

According to the old saying, “fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.”  Reports are rapidly surfacing of another massive ransomware attack involving, Russia, Ukraine, Spain, France, India and the UK similar to the attack of only a few weeks ago that used the WannaCry malware.  The new malware, which appears to be a variation of the Petya malware is being called GoldenEye and it is demanding bitcoin ransoms from banks, government agencies and companies in the attacked countries.  The malware appears to exploit the same Microsoft Windows Operating System flaw called EternalBlue which was made public by hackers of the National Security Agency.

This is a problem that should not have happened for many reasons.  The particular Microsoft vulnerability that this ransomware exploits has been patched, but some companies, government agencies and individuals had not yet installed the patches when they had become available recently.  In addition, many of the affected computers were using outdated Windows operating systems, such as Windows XP which are no longer regularly updated with new security patches.  These older unsupported systems should not be used by anyone.  Microsoft has taken the unprecedented step of providing security patches for these unsupported systems now in addition to its already issued security updates for presently supported Microsoft programs.  Here is a link to an important memo from Microsoft with links to free security updates if you are still using one of those older operating systems.

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

TIPS

This ransomware attack was primarily launched using phishing emails to lure unsuspecting people into clicking on links or downloading attachments tainted with the GoldenEye ransomware.  As I am constantly reminding you, never click on links or download attachments until you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

You also should update all of your electronic devices with the latest security updates and patches as soon as they become available, preferably automatically.

As for protecting yourself specifically from ransomware, you should back up all of your data in at least two different platforms, such as in the Cloud and on a portable hard drive. Companies and agencies which can afford to do this, should also use Whitelisting software which prevents the installation of any unauthorized computer software programs.

I will update you as further developments occur.

Scam of the day – June 15, 2017 – Microsoft issues new security patches for outdated operating systems

The huge ransomware attack using WannaCry malware that exploited vulnerabilities in the outdated Windows XP operating system prompted Microsoft to take the unprecedented step of issuing security patches to address this issue even though one of the primary reason for its movement to newer operating systems was due to the fact that it was no longer manageable to attempt to continually patch these flawed programs. In another unusual move, Microsoft has just issued new security updates for Windows XP, Windows Vista and other no longer supported operating systems on an emergency basis because of new warnings of a risk of another similar attack.  These new security updates can be downloaded for free.

TIPS

According to the old adage (is there any other kind?), fool me once, shame on you.  Fool me twice, shame on me.  No one should still be operating the older, unsupported Windows operating systems, such as Windows XP. Update your operating system as soon as possible to the newer supported versions of the Windows operating system.  Hackers and cybercriminals are constantly exploiting software vulnerabilities.  Failing to update your software when security updates and patches become available is extremely dangerous.

If, however, you are still using one of the older Windows operating systems, you can go to this link to find the latest security updates which you can download for free https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-us/

Scam of the day – June 7, 2017 – Google Chrome security update

As was made abundantly clear by the recent massive Wannacry ransomware attack that focused on a vulnerability in the Microsoft Windows operating system for which Microsoft had already issued a security update, constant updating of the software we all use with the latest security patches and updates is a critical part of avoiding scams and identity theft threats.  Whenever new security updates and patches are issued, we provide access to these so that you can update your software to provide better security on your computers, smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices.  Updating your software with the latest security patches and updates as soon as possible is important because identity thieves and scammers are always finding and exploiting vulnerabilities in the software that we all use.  Delay in updating your software could lead to disastrous results.  However, it is also important to be sure that you are downloading legitimate patches and updates rather than being tricked by an identity thief or scammer into downloading malware under the guise of downloading a security patch or update.  Today’s security update involves serious vulnerabilities in the popular search engine Google Chrome

TIPS

Here is a  link to this recent security update as posted by the Department of Homeland Security:

https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/current-activity/2017/06/06/Google-Releases-Security-Updates-Chrome

May 18, 2017 – Article from Spiceworks.com regarding the WannaCry ransomware attack

Here is a link to an article from Spiceworks.com in which I am quoted about the recent WannaCry ransomware attack.

https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/1995850-experts-stolen-nsa-exploit-behind-wannacry-is-the-first-of-many?source=navbar-community-notifications

May 13, 2017 – Urgent update about massive ransomware attack

Yesterday a massive ransomware attack targeted computers in seventy-four countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, China, Spain, France and India.   The strain of ransomware used is called WannaCrypt and it was developed to take advantage of a Microsoft Windows Operating System flaw called EternalBlue which was made public by hackers of the National Security Agency.   This ransomware is available in 28 languages.

This is a problem that should not have happened for many reasons.  The particular Microsoft vulnerability that this ransomware exploits has been patched, but some companies, government agencies and individuals had not yet installed the patches when they had become available recently.  In addition, many of the affected computers were using outdated Windows operating systems, such as Windows XP which are no longer regularly updated with new security patches.  These older unsupported systems should not be used by anyone.  Microsoft has taken the unprecedented step of providing security patches for these unsupported systems now in addition to its already issued security updates for presently supported Microsoft programs.  Here is a link to an important memo from Microsoft with links to free security updates if you are still using one of those older operating systems.

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

TIPS

This ransomware attack was primarily launched using phishing emails to lure unsuspecting people into clicking on links or downloading attachments tainted with the Wannacrypt ransomware.  As I am constantly reminding you, never click on links or download attachments until you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

You also should update all of your electronic devices with the latest security updates and patches as soon as they become available, preferably automatically.

As for protecting yourself specifically from ransomware, you should back up all of your data in at least two different platforms, such as in the Cloud and on a portable hard drive. Companies and agencies which can afford to do this, should also use Whitelisting software which prevents the installation of any unauthorized computer software programs.

Unfortunately, this is not going to be the last time that you learn about this type of story.