Scam of the day – September 11, 2017 – Social media tech support scams

As with any technology that we use, there usually comes a time when you need some tech support for large or small problems that may occur. Unfortunately, for much social media, you will not readily find a telephone number to call and speak to a real person about your problem. However when that happens, unfortunately many people turn to the Internet to search for a tech support telephone number and end up getting a telephone number for a scammer who will induce the victim to make a payment, often by iTunes gift cards, which are particularly popular with scammers these days.  Other times the scammers trick their victims into providing personal information that can be used to make the person a victim of identity theft.

TIPS

Among the social media services that do not provide tech support by phone are Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter.  Here are links to tech support for those social media services:

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/help/

Instagram: https://help.instagram.com/

Snapchat: https://support.snapchat.com/en-US

Twitter: https://support.twitter.com/

Scam of the day – June 3, 2017 – Hackers and scammers turning to social media

Recent reports by various security companies are indicating that state-sponsored Russian hackers, such as those that managed to plant fake news stories in an effort to disrupt the 2016 presidential election are increasingly turning to targeting social media accounts to download malware and spread disinformation.  This is a complex story and one worth knowing more about, however, as an individual, you are also susceptible to scams, ransomware and malware downloaded through clicking on links in social media postings.

We have long known that phishing emails and the more personally targeted spear phishing emails are how most malware gets downloaded on to the computers of individuals, companies and government agencies. However, as successful as phishing is in spreading malware, postings on social media, according to cybersecurity firm ZeroFOX are twice as successful in spreading malware.

And it makes sense.

In my May 5, 2017 Scam of the day I warned you about the risks of the Facebook “10 concerts, but there is one act that I haven’t seen live” quiz.   I highlighted the fact that scammers use social media to gather personal information that can later be used to tailor a message sent through social media such as Facebook or Twitter that you are more likely to trust and click on links in the messages that will download malware.

TIPS

Trust me, you can’t trust anyone.  Always be skeptical when you receive any kind of electronic communication that requires you to click on a link in the message.  Always confirm it before clicking on the link regardless of how trustworthy it may seem.  Further, you may well consider limiting the amount of personal information that you post on social media that can be used to tailor spear phishing emails to lure you a victim of identity theft or some other scam by appealing to something in which you are known to be interested.

Scam of the day – March 21, 2017 – European Commission acts to reduce social media based scams

Social media is an integral part of the lives of all of us and therefore it is often used by scammers to convey scams because people often put too much trust in postings and messages they receive through social media. Cognizant of this fact, the European Commission, led by French consumer authorities have given Facebook, Twitter and Google+ until April 16th to come up with proposals to address the growing number of scams using their social media.  If the proposals of these companies are deemed not satisfactory, the European Commission has indicated it would resort to enforcement actions.

TIPS

This is a positive step by the European Commission.  It starts with the recognition that scams are rampant on social media and then permits the various social media companies to have substantial input as to how they will constructively deal with this problem.  However, if the companies fail to act responsibly in this matter, the European Commission is ready to impose regulations.

As for all of us as consumers of social media services, the most important way to avoid scams on social media is to follow my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone” and always be skeptical of any offer you receive on social media, particularly ones that require you to provide personal information.  In addition, never click on links or download attachments unless you have absolutely confirmed that they are legitimate.