Scam of the day – Mary 19, 2017 – WiFi networks at Mar-a-Lago vulnerable

A recent report by ProPublica and Gizmodo has found security vulnerabilities in the WiFi networks at Mar-a-Lago, the resort often visited by President Trump as well as a number of other Trump destinations including the Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey, Trump International Hotel in Washington D.C. and Trump National Golf Club in Virginia.  According to the report, “Our inspections found weak and open WiFi networks, wireless printers without passwords, servers with outdated and vulnerable software and unencrypted login pages to back-end databases containing sensitive information.”  As would be expected the White House is not commenting on this report other than to indicate that these locations follow cybersecurity best practices.  However, the important lesson to us all is to remind us that public WiFi is never secure. However, with some precautions it can be made safer.

TIPS

Whatever electronic device you are using to connect to a WiFi network, whether it is a computer, laptop, tablet or smartphone should be equipped with security software.  In addition, you should use encryption software so that your communications are encoded.  You also should go to your settings and turn off sharing.  In addition, you should make sure that your firewall is current and turned on.  Finally, and perhaps most importantly, you should consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) which enables you to send your communications through a separate and secure private network even while you are on a public network.

Scam of the day – August 14, 2016 – Kimpton Hotels investigating possible data breach

Kimpton Hotels,  a chain of 62 boutique hotels is looking into a possible data breach, which essentially means that they were indeed hacked and they are just trying to confirm this fact.  Almost in every instance when companies are hacked, it is the credit and debit card processors that notice a pattern of fraudulent card use and then trace it back to the hacked companies, which in this instance appears to have occurred in almost half of the Kimpton hotels in the  United States. When this is confirmed, Kimpton will just be the latest of a long line of hotels including  Omni Hotels and Resorts, Hyatt, Hotels, Starwood Hotels, Hilton Hotels and Trump Hotels (twice) that all suffered similar data breaches in the last year in which credit card and debit card information of their customers was stolen by unknown hackers.

The primary reasons for the continuing problem of data breaches at hotel chains are the weak cybersecurity of many hotel chains coupled with these companies still using credit card and debit card processors for cards with magnetic strips rather than the safer smart EMV chip cards.  Regulations effective October 1, 2015  mandated credit card issuers and retailers switch over to the new smart EMV chip cards or risk increased legal liability, but unfortunately, many companies have been slow to switch to the new card processing equipment.  If smart EMV chip cards had been used at Kimpton Hotels, the card information that was stolen would have been worthless, but since they still used the old fashioned magnetic strip cards, Kimpton and its customers face financial problems from this data breach.

TIPS

Until credit card issuing companies and brick and mortar stores and businesses that take credit cards switch to the new smart EMV chip cards, this story will, as I predicted  more than a year ago, continue to occur again and again.  As for us, as consumers, the best we can do is to refrain from using our debit cards for anything other than an ATM card because consumers whose debit card security has been breached are not protected as much as when a credit card is used for fraudulent purchases.  In addition, if you do not already have a new smart EMV chip card, you should demand one from your credit card company.  You also should regularly monitor your credit card statements for indications of fraudulent use.