Scam of the day – August 7, 2017 – Another twist on the Nigerian letter scam

Although it may seem as if the Nigerian letter scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the Nigerian email scam of today is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner con.”  At that time, a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In  the present day incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money under various guises such as assisting a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below deals with undisclosed reasons for transferring money outside of the country.

What all of these scams have in common is that as soon as you contact the scammer, they start asking you to provide money for a variety of purposes and regardless of how much money you pay, you never receive anything.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

“Dear Good FriendI am Mr. Abdoul Issouf ,I work for BOA Bank Ouagadougou Burkina Faso,
I have a business proposal which concerns the transfer of ($13.5
Million US Dollars) into a foreign account. Everything about this
transaction shall be legally done without any problem. If you are
interested to help me, I will give you more details as soon as I
receive your positive response. You will be entitled to 40%, and 60%
will be for me,. If you are willing to Work with me, send me your
reply Immediately with your Age and your Nationality and your Name
and your Occupation and your Private Telephone Numbers?Thanks
Mr. Abdoul Issouf
BOA (D.R.T) Bank Of Africa”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so ridiculous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note that the salutation does not even indicate to whom the email is being sent.  Instead, the lazy scammer merely addresses it as “Dear Good Friend” Never  reply to emails such as this.    If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

 

Scam of the day – January 13, 3017 – A new version of the Nigerian letter

Although it may seem as if this scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the Nigerian email scam of today is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner con.  At that time, a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In one of the present day typical incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below deals with abandoned property.

What all of these scams have in common is that as soon as you contact the scammer, the need for you  to provide fees for a variety of purposes becomes apparent and regardless of how much money you pay, you never receive anything.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

 

“Good Day!

I am contacting you regarding a special cargo that has been abandoned here at our warehouse for over a period of 2 years and when scanned, it revealed an undisclosed sum of money in it. From my findings, the cargo originated from Europe and the content was not declared as money by the consignor in order to avoid diversion by the shipping agent, and also failure to pay the special cargo non-inspection fee of 3,475  . I strongly believe the box will contain about 4.6 million or more.

In my private search for a reliable person, my proposal now is to present you as the recipient of the cargo since the shipper has abandoned it which is a possibility due to the fact it has been abandoned for a period whereby a new beneficiary can be presented to the clearance department for claim and also my position at this shipping service. I will pay for the fee and arrange for the cargo to be delivered to your address. Alternatively, I can personally bring it myself and then we share the total money in the box equally.

Regards,

Mr. Lewis Hawkins
Asst. Operations Manager
ZIM Integrated Shipping Services Ltd
Chicago (IL) Agents: 9950 W.Lawrence Avenue,
Suite 215 Schiller Park, IL 60176”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so ridiculous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note that the salutation does not even indicate to whom the email is being sent.  Instead, the lazy scammer merely addresses it as “Good day! ” Never  reply to emails such as this.     If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – December 13, 2015 – A new version of the Nigerian email scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you, as well.  This is just another version of the Nigerian email scam although this one appears to have originated in Ghana.   Although it may seem that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The example below of the email I received involves a shady consignment deal.  Although generally, you are told initially that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“I am B. Komeng, Director, Aviation Security (GHANA AIRPORT COMPANY) in Greater Accra field International Airport West Africa, During one of my investigation I discovered An abandoned shipment of two Metallic Trunk Boxes that was transferred from US International Airport (JFK) back to our Airport facility here in Accra Ghana and when scanned it revealed an undisclosed Funds and about 50Kilos of Gold in Metal Trunk Boxes weighing approximately 50 and 40kg each. These consignments was abandoned because the Content was not properly declared by the delivery shipping agent as above mentioned items rather it was declared as personal effect to avoid diversion and tax. On my assumption, the very box that contains Funds amounted US$5.Five Million United States of American Dollars and the consignments are still left in the Storage House till today. Friend, I want you and I to transact this deal together and share the profit together since the shipper has abandoned it and ran away due to improper declaration and improper documentation. I want front you as the beneficiary and Consignee to these boxes, As you can see, I am still an officer with airport company, I cannot be found to be associated with these consignment hence I cannot call for its delivery, if it is discovered that I have a particular interest in these consignments, it will be seized by Government indefinitely. I can arrange for the boxes to be moved out of this Airport to your address if you agreed to accept the delivery and we work together in procuring necessary legal paperwork to back you up as the legal beneficiary, once we are through I will deploy the services of a secured shipping Company geared to provide the security it needs to deliver these consignments to your address. I am willing to work with you on the understanding of a partnership basis, We shall share the profit 50% 50% upon the completion of this transaction, I can assure you of no trouble in this transaction and my guarantee to you is that we can actualize our goal within four working days if we can work in one accord also to be honest with you, we can only work in partnership to realize this goal, reasons being that as I have stated above to you that one of the very crucial reasons why they agent failed in having the consignments delivered was due to the improper documentation. Thanks. B. Komeng.”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are often not good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

 

Scam of the day – July 17, 2015 – Yet another Nigerian email scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received may not even be from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told initially that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

Dear Friend,
With due respect to your person and much sincerity of purpose . I have a business proposal which I will like to handle with you. $35 million USD is involves. But be rest assured that everything is legal and risk free as I have concluded all the arrangements and the legal papers that will back the transaction up. Kindly indicate your interest as to enable me tell you more detail of the proposal.
Waiting for your urgent response.
Yours Faithfully,
Dr.Lincoln Bah Bah

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are often not good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

Scam of the day – May 7, 2015 – The latest Nigerian letter scam email

Although it may seem as if this scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the scam itself is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner Con.  At that time a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the more recent incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below falls in the category of the assistance being needed in making  charitable distributions.

What all of these scams have in common is that soon after agreeing to help, you learn that money is needed to be sent by you for lawyer fees, bribes, insurance and other costs.  The reward is always just around the corner and the fees keep mounting.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

“Charitable Donation From Mrs. Gretchen Mishra                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Abidjan Cote D’Ivoire                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Attention!!!!

Greetings in the name of the LORD Almighty the giver of every good thing. I know this proposal will definitely come to you as a huge surprise, but I implore you to take your time to go through it carefully as the decision you make will go a long way to determine my future. I am Mrs. Gretchen Mishra an ageing widow of 57 years old suffering from long time illness breast Cancer and Cancer of the lungs. I have some funds which I inherited from my late husband, the sum of USD $4,500,000.00 and I needed a very honest and God fearing person who can withdraw this money then use the funds for Charity works.

I WISH TO ENTRUST THIS FUND TO YOU FOR CHARITY WORKS. I found your email address from the internet after honest prayers to the LORD to bring me HONEST PERSON I CAN CONFIDE ON, and I decided to contact you if you may be willing and interested to handle these trust funds in good faith. I am desperately in keen need of assistance and I have summoned up courage to contact you for this task, you must not fail me and the millions of the poor people in our today’s WORLD.
This is not stolen money and there are no dangers involved. Please if you would be able to use the funds for the Charity works please kindly let me know immediately. Please kindly respond quickly for further details if you can handle this task.
Regards,
Mrs. Gretchen Mishra”

TIP

There are a number of ways to confirm that the email you are receiving is a scam including a careful review of the email address, however, you do not need to even go that far in your considerations.  Although you may want to open the email (so long as you do not click on any links, which can lead to your downloading malware that can lead to identity theft) for sheer entertainment purposes, all of these scenarios are scams.  Just ask yourself, why are you being singled out for this email?  You are not.  The emails are sent out all over the Internet.  Don’t be a victim.  Do not respond to the email in any fashion.  If you do, you will be hounded.

Scam of the day – February 4, 2015 – Another Nigerian letter scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received isn’t from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“How are you doing today?

Hope all is well with you? Am sorry to disturb you please bear with me just that i need your help. my name is Miss Judith Irene, the only daughter and the only child of late Engr. Bernard Bakary Irene. the Director of Bajam Enterprise (Building Construction Company in Kenya) also the CEO of Bernard Import and Export (KENYA).

I am 25 years old girl Single, But at the present am staying in the Refugee Camp, In Ouagadougou Burkina Faso, West Africa, i want you to help me relocate to your country to further my education. Before the death of my father, my father deposited sum amount of money total Amount [USD$ 4.500,000.00] FOUR MILLION, FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND US DOLLARS ] in one of the leading bank out of my country which i am the next of kin before he met his untimely death. he instructed me while on his sick bed to look for a foreign partner not from this country who will help me and transfer this money out of here and invest it for me, my purpose of contacting you is for you to help me and transfer the money into your account pending my arrival to you to start a new life over there.

So: after the death of my father as a result of poison, his brother (My Uncle) who is the purchasing and marketing sale manager of my late fathers company named (Mr. Tokunbo Oriade Irene) wanted to convert all the properties and resources of my late father into his, which i quarreled with him and it made him to lay his anger on me to the extent of hiring an
assassins to kill me but to God be the glory i succeeded by making a way to Ouagadougou Burkina Faso, West Africa,for my dear life.

As a matter of fact my mother died when i was barely 4 years old according to my late father and the type of love he had for my mother made him to remain un-married till he left the ghost. Honestly i do live a fearful life even here in Ouagadougou Burkina Faso, because of those Assassins coming after me since Ouagadougou Burkina Faso, and my country Kenya is all in Africa.
.
As a matter of fact i wish not to stay here again; rather i want to leave here immediately. Perhaps I disclosed this to you alone with love and trust which i deposed in you and wish the same from you.

I contact the bank to verify the method of the transfer with the bank director and he told me that they can not release the money to me, unless I provide to the bank a trustee who will invest the money for me, he said that is the agreement between the bank and my late father.

I hope you will not betray the trust I have on you? Because this money is my only hope in life, you will also help me to relocate over to your country to continue my education while you will invest the money for me in any good Business of your choice there in your country, I will compensate you with 35% for your kind assistance, while you will invest 65% in any
business of your choice.

You will be taking care of me from the profit you make from the business which you will use to sponsor me to the university, I can assure you there is No Risk involve, the money is an inheritance from my late father I also secured the deposit document of the money with me, when I receive your return message I will forward to you the full Details of the transfer.

information, i will like to know your full detail’s:exp.

1. Your name………………………….
2. Your age…………………………..
3. Your address……………………….
4. Your phone number……………………….
5. Your Occupation………………….
6. Your Country……………………….
I am waiting to receive your reply as soonest.

Reply to my private E-mail address ( judit.irene2015@yandex.com )
Yours Sincerely,
Miss Judith Irene”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are not very good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

Scam of the day – August 20, 2014 – Nigerian letter scam Iraqi style

Although it may seem as if this scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the scam itself is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called the Spanish Prisoner Con.  At that time a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the more recent incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  Similar scams have managed to keep up with the news by appearing to originate in China or, in this case, Iraq.

What all of these scams have in common is that soon after agreeing to help, you learn that money is needed to be sent by you for lawyer fees, bribes, insurance and other costs.  The reward is always just around the corner and the fees keep mounting.

Here is an example of an email I recently received.

“Dear Sir

With much sincerity of purpose, I make this contract with you after satisfactory information we gathered from the Chamber of Commerce here in Iraq.

I am a private staff for Haider J. Hamza a Senior Accountant back in my country with various influence at the Ministry of oil; I believe my proposal will interest you.
My boss have decided and instruct me to contact you secretly in view of transferring the sum of US$55.5M [Fifty Five Million Five Hundred Thousand United States Dollars] only to your Company or Personal Account through the remittance banks used by our country scattered all over the western countries and some A-list banks in Asia.

However total confidential and legal arrangement requires to be smoothly executed to have funds either transferred or as to be determine by factors as our communication progresses.This particular funds is projected from an over invoiced contracted award to a foreign company who has long been paid and the over invoice remains dormant for many years now.Since the completion and payment has far exceed the period of six years; the constitution allows my principal to use his discretion and his candid returns in the past was turn in for personal gains by far superiors, hence he intend doing something for himself this time.

As persons under government pay roll, it is indicting to openly take possession of such funds which is where your assistance as the foreign contactor is highly required.
Among others; my principal we ensure :
Payment approval from relevant offices for the release of the contract sum in favour of your Personal / Company details.
You are expected to furnish us with necessary details such as:
Your personal name in full.
Name and Address of your Company.
Proof of tax paid in your country for a minimum period of 1yr. (Personal tax payment proof or company tax payment proof) is acceptable.

The sharing mode as proposed by my principal is 35% for your company and 65% for him
I anxiously wait to hear from you.
Zaher AbdulKarrem.
email: zaherabkarrem@yandex.com”

TIP

There are a number of ways to confirm that the email you are receiving is a scam including a careful review of the email address, however, you do not need to even go that far in your considerations.  Although you may want to open the email (so long as you do not click on to any links) for sheer entertainment purposes, all of these scenarios are scams.  Just ask yourself, why are you being singled out for this email?  You are not.  The emails are sent out all over the Internet.  Don’t be a victim.  Do not respond to the email in any fashion.  If you do, you will be hounded.

Scam of the day – February 27, 2014 – Another Nigerian letter that isn’t from Nigeria

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received isn’t from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“Dear Friend,
i need your kind attention. I will be very glad if  you do assist me to relocate this sum of ( US$15.Million dollars.) to your bank account for the benefit of our both families.
only i cannot operate it alone without using a Foreigner who will stand as a beneficiary to the money, that is why i decided to contact you in a good manner to assist me and also to share the benefit together with me.
for the sharing of the fund 50/50 base on the fact that it is two man business note that you are not taking any risk because there will be a legal back up document as well which will back the money up into your bank account there in your country.
all i need from you now is to indicating your interest and I will send you the full details on how the business will be executed.
Thanks & Best Regards,
Dr Lahman”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are not very good.

 

Scam of the day – January 8, 2014 – Not all Nigerian emails come from Nigeria

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received purports to be from Afghanistan, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“DEAR FRIEND, PLEASE ALLOW ME TO INTRODUCE MYSELF.I AM CAPTAIN GREG, IN 4TH BATTALION, 64TH ARMORED REGIMENT UNIT HERE THAT PATROLS THE HELMAND PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN.I AM SEEKING YOUR ASSISTANCE TO EVACUATE THE SUM OF TWENTY FIVE MILLION UNITED STATES DOLLARS TO YOU, AS FAR AS I CAN BE ASSURED THAT IT WILL BE SAFE IN YOUR CARE UNTIL I COMPLETE MY SERVICE HERE. THIS IS NO STOLEN MONEY AND THERE ARE NO DANGERS INVOLVED.GET BACK FOR FULL DETAILS.EMAIL:greg123@r7.com”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.