Scam of the day – January 18, 2016 – Identity theft dangers of social media

Social media is as much a part of modern day life as a morning cup of coffee.  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and many other social media sites are the primary way that many people communicate.  With more than 500 million people on Facebook alone, you can expect that identity thieves will be there taking advantage of the opportunities for identity theft presented by social media.  Although many social media scams involve luring people into clicking on links containing keystroke logging malware that will steal the information from your computer or smartphone and use it to make you a victim of identity theft, a major source of identity theft involving social media involves people posting too much personal information about themselves that can be manipulated by identity thieves for their illegal purposes.

Recently the Niagara County New York County Clerk Joseph A. Jastrzemski issued a warning about people putting photographs of their driver’s licenses on Facebook and other social media.  Too often, a young person who just got his or her driver’s license will post a photo of the license on social media without realizing that he or she is providing information, such as address and birth date than can be used to either contribute toward their becoming a victim of identity theft or for purposes of creating phony driver’s licenses which can be sold on the black market that can result in the victim of the identity theft having motor vehicle offenses that turn up on his or her  own driving record.

TIPS

When it comes to posting personal information on social media, often the less you provide the better. Don’t ever post driver’s licenses or other forms of personal identification.  Too much personal information in the hands of an identity thief can make his job easier to target you for spear phishing emails or text messages that use the information they have harvested from their intended victim’s social media to make their spear phishing communications seem legitimate.  This can result in the victims trusting the communications and downloading keystroke logging malware.

Don’t befriend everyone that asks.  Identity thieves will contact you with phony profiles to lure you into providing information they can use to make you a victim of identity theft.  Also, check out the privacy policy of the various social media sites you use.  You may be providing more information than you want to share with other people.