Posts Tagged: ‘paypal scam’

Scam of the day – January 5, 2016 – PayPal account verification scam

January 5, 2016 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes directly from my own email and I am sure it has turned up in yours as well.  PayPal is a popular payment service used by many people particularly with eBay.  Therefore it can seem plausible when you receive an email that purports to come from PayPal asking you to clear up an undisclosed problem with your account.  However, anyone responding to the email copied below would either end up providing personal information to an identity thief or merely by clicking on the link could download keystroke logging malware that will steal the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK.

Confirm your account with PayPal

Dear User,

Your account has been temporarily Limited if you want unlock it

please check it from here:

Click Here

  • Receive cross-border payments from the many countries that PayPal serves.
  • Withdraw your payments to the bank account you selected.
  • Become verified and remove your spending limit.

NOTE: If this is not resolved within 24 hours, we will be forced to susupend your account Permanently as it may be used fraudulently. The purpose of this verification is to ensure that your account has not been fraudulently used.

Yours sincerely,
PayPal

Please do not reply to this email because we are not monitoring this inbox. To get in touch with us, log in to your account and click “Contact Us” at the bottom of any page.

Copyright © 2015 Inc. All rights reserved.

Consumer advisory: PayPal Pte Ltd, the Holder of the PayPal™ payment service stored value facility, does not require the approval of the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Consumers (users) are advised to read the terms and conditions carefully.

PayPal Email ID PP1629

This particular phishing email is not particularly sophisticated. Although it came with what appears to be a legitimate PayPal logo, that logo is easy to counterfeit.  More importantly It came from an email address of a private person rather than that of PayPal.  The address used, most likely is that of someone whose email account and computer was hacked in order for the identity thief to send out these phishing emails in mass quantities. It also is not directed to me personally, but rather uses the salutation, “Dear User,” which is another indication that this is just a phishing scam.  There also is a spelling error in the word “susupend” which should be “suspend” as well as the improper capitalizing of the word “Permanently.”  These are both indications that the email is not legitimate.

TIPS

The primary question we all face when we receive such an email asking for personal information or urging us to click on a link is how do we know whether to trust the email or not.  The answer is, as I always say, trust me, you can’t trust anyone.  Regardless of how legitimate such emails appear, you should not provide any personal information or click on any links until you have independently verified by phone call or email to an email address that you know is accurate that the request for personal information is legitimate.

Scam of the day – August 15, 2015 – Paypal email phishing scam

August 14, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes directly from my own email and I am sure it has turned up in yours as well.  PayPal is a popular payment service used by many people particularly with eBay.  Therefore it can seem plausible when you receive an email that purports to come from PayPal asking you to update your credit card information.  However, anyone responding to the email copied below would either end up providing credit card information to an identity thief or merely by clicking on the link could download keystroke logging malware that will steal the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK.

“Account User,

The credit card in your account has expired; you are required to update your payment method to keep your account active.

Rectify payment method today by following the link below:

https://www.paypal.com/ca/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_add%id3752891

You can always add a new card

Sincerely,
PayPal”

This particular phishing email is not particularly sophisticated.  It comes from an email address of a private person rather than that of PayPal.  The address used, most likely is that of someone whose email account and computer was hacked in order for the identity thief to send out these phishing emails in mass quantities. It is not addressed to me personally, no logo of the company appears anywhere in the email and the language of “rectify payment” is somewhat inappropriate.  It is a pretty amateurish attempt.

TIPS

The primary question we all face when we receive such an email asking for credit card information or other personal information that may appear to be legitimate is how do we know whether to trust it or not.  The answer is, as I always say, trust me, you can’t trust anyone.  Regardless of how legitimate such email appear, you should not provide any personal information until you have independently verified by phone call or email to an email address that you know is accurate that the request for personal information is legitimate.

Scam of the day – December 12, 2012 – PayPal holiday scams

December 12, 2012 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Many people use PayPal for safe online holiday shopping which is why scammers and identity thieves often pose as PayPal in an effort to steal money or the identity of their victims.  The scam generally begins with an email that purports to acknowledge payment by you for something that you have obviously not purchase.  A link in the email, however, is provided if you wish to dispute the charge.  Don’t click on the link.  As I have told you many times before clicking on links which you are not sure are secure places you in danger of identity theft by taking you to a website where you are prompted to provide information that can make you a victim of identity theft or even worse, clicking on the link can result in your downloading a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer including passwords, credit card numbers, bank account information and your Social Security number.

TIPS

If you receive such an email, remember that you can never be sure when you receive an email whether it is legitmate or not.  If you have any questions, you should contact the company, such as PayPal directly through their official website, an email directed to an address that you know is correct or by phone at a number that you know is correct.  It is also important to remember that PayPal and other legitimate companies will not ask for your Social Security number or PINs.