Scam of the day – September 3, 2017 – Western Union lottery email scam

People are reporting receiving the email copied below informing them that they are one of seven people who have won a huge cash prize through a non-existent program described as the United Nations Poverty Alleviation Program. The idea behind this scam is simple and one that has been used many times previously. You are told, as with the Nigerian letter scam or phony lottery scams, that you have won or inherited a large amount of money. At first you are told that there are no fees involved, but as your communications with the scammer increase, you are asked time and time again for money under various guises, such as necessary fees or administrative costs.  Ultimately, you receive nothing.

As scam emails go, this one is not particularly good and has a myriad of indications that it is a scam.  It purports to come from Western Union, but even though it carries a legitimate looking Western Union logo, the email address is that of someone whose email account has been hacked and made a part of a botnet to send out massive amounts of these emails.  In addition, the email is directed to “Dear Beneficiary” rather than your real name.  As with many other scams that may originate in foreign countries, the grammar is quite poor.

TIPS

It is hard to win a contest or lottery you enter.  It is impossible to win one that you have never entered.  Whenever you receive such an email, you should be immediately skeptical.  It is also important to remember that no legitimate lottery will ever ask you for fees or administrative costs to claim your prize.  In addition, while income taxes are owed on lottery winnings, no lottery collects them from you.  They either deduct taxes from your prize or leave it to you to pay the taxes to the IRS.

 

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Scam of the day – August 7, 2017 – Another twist on the Nigerian letter scam

Although it may seem as if the Nigerian letter scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the Nigerian email scam of today is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner con.”  At that time, a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In  the present day incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money under various guises such as assisting a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below deals with undisclosed reasons for transferring money outside of the country.

What all of these scams have in common is that as soon as you contact the scammer, they start asking you to provide money for a variety of purposes and regardless of how much money you pay, you never receive anything.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

“Dear Good FriendI am Mr. Abdoul Issouf ,I work for BOA Bank Ouagadougou Burkina Faso,
I have a business proposal which concerns the transfer of ($13.5
Million US Dollars) into a foreign account. Everything about this
transaction shall be legally done without any problem. If you are
interested to help me, I will give you more details as soon as I
receive your positive response. You will be entitled to 40%, and 60%
will be for me,. If you are willing to Work with me, send me your
reply Immediately with your Age and your Nationality and your Name
and your Occupation and your Private Telephone Numbers?Thanks
Mr. Abdoul Issouf
BOA (D.R.T) Bank Of Africa”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so ridiculous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note that the salutation does not even indicate to whom the email is being sent.  Instead, the lazy scammer merely addresses it as “Dear Good Friend” Never  reply to emails such as this.    If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

 

Scam of the day – June 24, 2017 – Inheritance email scam

The Nigerian letter scam by which you are promised huge amounts of money through an email under various guises, such as an inheritance from a relative you never knew existed or a public official who needs help getting money out of his country, is a scam that has actually been around since the 1500s when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner scam.  While the scam promises money for nothing,  the truth is once you start communicating with the scammer, you are asked to pay one fee after another.  One thing that this scam has in common in all of its incarnations is that if you respond to the scam, you will not end up getting anything except a lesson in learning to be more skeptical.  Many people have paid thousands of dollars to Nigerian letter scam artists before they realize that they have been the victim of a scam.

I don’t publish every one of these types of letters that I receive, but I wanted to share this new version of the letter that Scamicide reader Marty Kenney received earlier this week.

“Good Day.
We wish to notify you again that you were listed as beneficiary to the total
sum US$9 of Million only in the intent of the deceased. On my first email I
mentioned about my late client whose relatives I cannot get in touch with.
But both of you have the same last name so it will be very easy to front you as his official next of kin. I am compelled to do this because I would not want the finance house to push my clients funds into their treasury as
unclaimed inheritance.

We contacted you because you bear the Last name with our Late Client and
therefore can present you as the Beneficiary to the inheritance since there
is no written WILL or Bequest.Our legal services aim to provide our private
clients with a complete service. We are happy to set-up all modalities and
administer Trusts,carry out the administration of estates. All the papers
will be processed in your acceptance of this Transaction.

Note that you are to furnishing me with the requested information’s below
immediately;

(1)Full names.
(2)Contact address.
(3)Telephone and fax numbers.
(4)Location.

If you are interested do let me know so that I can give you Comprehensive
details on what we are to do. Waiting for your response.

Yours faithfully,

Barr. Philip Mark”

 

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so outrageous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  You may also pick up on grammatical errors, such as “Note that you are to furnishing me” in the email which is often an indication of a scam perpetrated by someone whose primary language is not English.  The name of the lawyer used in the email of Philip Mark is a name that appears in many Nigerian email scams.  Another indication that this is a scam is that the salutation is not directed to you by name.  In fact, this particular email was sent as a mass email mailing to many people who did not, as indicated in the email, share the same name.

If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – December 13, 2015 – A new version of the Nigerian email scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you, as well.  This is just another version of the Nigerian email scam although this one appears to have originated in Ghana.   Although it may seem that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The example below of the email I received involves a shady consignment deal.  Although generally, you are told initially that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“I am B. Komeng, Director, Aviation Security (GHANA AIRPORT COMPANY) in Greater Accra field International Airport West Africa, During one of my investigation I discovered An abandoned shipment of two Metallic Trunk Boxes that was transferred from US International Airport (JFK) back to our Airport facility here in Accra Ghana and when scanned it revealed an undisclosed Funds and about 50Kilos of Gold in Metal Trunk Boxes weighing approximately 50 and 40kg each. These consignments was abandoned because the Content was not properly declared by the delivery shipping agent as above mentioned items rather it was declared as personal effect to avoid diversion and tax. On my assumption, the very box that contains Funds amounted US$5.Five Million United States of American Dollars and the consignments are still left in the Storage House till today. Friend, I want you and I to transact this deal together and share the profit together since the shipper has abandoned it and ran away due to improper declaration and improper documentation. I want front you as the beneficiary and Consignee to these boxes, As you can see, I am still an officer with airport company, I cannot be found to be associated with these consignment hence I cannot call for its delivery, if it is discovered that I have a particular interest in these consignments, it will be seized by Government indefinitely. I can arrange for the boxes to be moved out of this Airport to your address if you agreed to accept the delivery and we work together in procuring necessary legal paperwork to back you up as the legal beneficiary, once we are through I will deploy the services of a secured shipping Company geared to provide the security it needs to deliver these consignments to your address. I am willing to work with you on the understanding of a partnership basis, We shall share the profit 50% 50% upon the completion of this transaction, I can assure you of no trouble in this transaction and my guarantee to you is that we can actualize our goal within four working days if we can work in one accord also to be honest with you, we can only work in partnership to realize this goal, reasons being that as I have stated above to you that one of the very crucial reasons why they agent failed in having the consignments delivered was due to the improper documentation. Thanks. B. Komeng.”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are often not good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

 

Scam of the day – July 2, 2015 – A new Nigerian letter scam

The Nigerian letter scam by which you are promised huge amounts of money through an email under various guises, such as an inheritance from a relative you never knew existed or a public official who needs help getting money out of his country is a scam that has actually been around since the 1500s when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner scam.  One thing that this scam has in common in all of its incarnations is that if you respond to the scam, you will not end up getting anything except a lesson in learning to be more skeptical.  Many people have paid thousands of dollars to Nigerian letter scam artists before they realize that they have been the victim of a scam.

I don’t publish every one of these types of letters that I receive, but I wanted to share this particularly creative version of the letter that I got last week.

“Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Anti-Terrorist And Monitory Crime Division.
Federal Bureau Of Investigation.
INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUNDS
J.Edgar.Hoover Building Washington Dc
Customers Service Hours / Monday To Saturday
Office Hours Monday to Saturday:

Dear Beneficiary,

Series of meetings have been held over the past 7 months with the secretary general of the United Nations Organization. This ended 3 days ago. It is obvious that you have not received your fund which is to the tune of $2.3million Usd due to past corrupt Governmental Officials who almost held the fund to themselves for their selfish reason and some individuals who have taken advantage of your fund all in an attempt to swindle your fund which has led to so many losses from your end and unnecessary delay in the receipt of your fund.

The National Central Bureau of Interpol enhanced by the United Nations and Federal Bureau of Investigation and the International monetary funds have successfully passed a mandate to the current president of Nigeria his Excellency President Good luck Jonathan to boost the exercise of clearing all foreign debts owed to you and other individuals and organizations who have been found not to have receive their Contract Sum, Lottery/Gambling, Inheritance and the likes. Now how would you like to receive your payment? Because we have two method of payment which is by Check or by ATM card?
ATM Card: We will be issuing you a custom pin based ATM card which you will use to withdraw up to $3,000 per day from any ATM machine that has the Master Card Logo on it and the card have to be renewed in 4 years time which is 2015. Also with the ATM card you will be able to transfer your funds to your local bank account. The ATM card comes with a handbook or manual to enlighten you about how to use it. Even if you do not have a bank account.

Check: To be deposited in your bank for it to be cleared within three working days. Your payment would be sent to you via any of your preferred option and would be mailed to you via UPS. Because we have signed a contract with UPS which should expire in the next three weeks you will only need to pay $280 instead of $620 saving you $340 So if you pay before the three weeks you save $340 Take note that anyone asking you for some kind of money above the usual fee is definitely a fraudsters and you will have to stop any communication with every other person if you have been in contact with any. Also remember that all you will ever have to spend is $280.00 nothing more!
Nothing less! And we guarantee the receipt of your fund to be successfully delivered to you within the next 24hrs after the receipt of payment has been confirmed.

Note: Everything has been taken care of by the Federal Government of Nigeria the International Monetary Funds, The United Nation and also the FBI and including taxes, custom paper and clearance duty so all you will ever need to pay is $280.

DO NOT SEND MONEY TO ANYONE UNTIL YOU READ THIS: The actual fees for shipping your ATM card is $420 but because UPS have temporarily discontinued the C.O.D which gives you the chance to pay when package is delivered for international shipping We had to sign contract with them for bulk shipping which makes the fees reduce from the actual fee of $620 to $280 nothing more and no hidden fees of any sort!

To effect the release of your fund valued at $2.3million Usd you are advised to contact our correspondent in Africa the delivery officer Mr Nicholas Justina with the information below,

Full Name:Mr Nicholas Justina
Email: nicholas_justina@aol.com
Email:nicholasjustina2@gmail.com
Telephone: (719) 377-2771
You are advised to contact him with the informations as stated below:

Your full Name..
Your Address:…………..
Home/Cell Phone:…………..
Occupation:………………..
Preferred Payment Method (ATM / Cashier Check)

Upon receipt of payment the delivery officer will ensure that your package is sent within 24 working hours. Because we are so sure of everything we are giving you a 100% money back guarantee if you do not receive payment/package within the next 24hrs after you have made the payment for shipping.

Yours sincerely,
Miss Donna Story
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20535”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so outrageous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note the misspelling of the word “monetary” that appears as “monitory crime commission.”  Of course, by the fact that you are reading Scamicide, you have already indicated that you are too smart to fall for this type of scam.  If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – August 20, 2014 – Nigerian letter scam Iraqi style

Although it may seem as if this scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the scam itself is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called the Spanish Prisoner Con.  At that time a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the more recent incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  Similar scams have managed to keep up with the news by appearing to originate in China or, in this case, Iraq.

What all of these scams have in common is that soon after agreeing to help, you learn that money is needed to be sent by you for lawyer fees, bribes, insurance and other costs.  The reward is always just around the corner and the fees keep mounting.

Here is an example of an email I recently received.

“Dear Sir

With much sincerity of purpose, I make this contract with you after satisfactory information we gathered from the Chamber of Commerce here in Iraq.

I am a private staff for Haider J. Hamza a Senior Accountant back in my country with various influence at the Ministry of oil; I believe my proposal will interest you.
My boss have decided and instruct me to contact you secretly in view of transferring the sum of US$55.5M [Fifty Five Million Five Hundred Thousand United States Dollars] only to your Company or Personal Account through the remittance banks used by our country scattered all over the western countries and some A-list banks in Asia.

However total confidential and legal arrangement requires to be smoothly executed to have funds either transferred or as to be determine by factors as our communication progresses.This particular funds is projected from an over invoiced contracted award to a foreign company who has long been paid and the over invoice remains dormant for many years now.Since the completion and payment has far exceed the period of six years; the constitution allows my principal to use his discretion and his candid returns in the past was turn in for personal gains by far superiors, hence he intend doing something for himself this time.

As persons under government pay roll, it is indicting to openly take possession of such funds which is where your assistance as the foreign contactor is highly required.
Among others; my principal we ensure :
Payment approval from relevant offices for the release of the contract sum in favour of your Personal / Company details.
You are expected to furnish us with necessary details such as:
Your personal name in full.
Name and Address of your Company.
Proof of tax paid in your country for a minimum period of 1yr. (Personal tax payment proof or company tax payment proof) is acceptable.

The sharing mode as proposed by my principal is 35% for your company and 65% for him
I anxiously wait to hear from you.
Zaher AbdulKarrem.
email: zaherabkarrem@yandex.com”

TIP

There are a number of ways to confirm that the email you are receiving is a scam including a careful review of the email address, however, you do not need to even go that far in your considerations.  Although you may want to open the email (so long as you do not click on to any links) for sheer entertainment purposes, all of these scenarios are scams.  Just ask yourself, why are you being singled out for this email?  You are not.  The emails are sent out all over the Internet.  Don’t be a victim.  Do not respond to the email in any fashion.  If you do, you will be hounded.

Scam of the day – August 2, 2014 – Nigerian letter, Chinese style

By now everyone is familiar with the so-called Nigerian letter scam which starts with your receiving an email from Nigerian telling you of an inheritance or some other way that you have been fortunate enough to be receiving a fortune.  At first it appears that you do not have to do anything to claim your money, but as time goes on more and more fees make their way into the mix, from taxes to administrative fees to even bribes of public officials, the victim ends up paying thousands of dollars and ultimately receiving nothing.  These emails are still being sent and they are still successful too much of the time as some people’s greed blinds their good sense.  This scam has worked with little variation for more than six hundred years.

Now we have a new variation.  In this new version of the scam you receive an actual letter from a private wealth management company affiliated with a bank in China.  You are told that a deceased client of the company has a name that is very similar to yours and that the client died leaving nine million dollars which has been wisely invested to a point where it is now worth twelve million dollars.  The scammers sending you this letter know your actual name and direct the letter to you by name and describe the dead relative with a name quite similar to yours.  The letter is well written and looks official.  Once again, the letter initially makes it appear that claiming the millions is simple and at no cost, but as time goes by more and more funds are required to be paid in order to claim your inheritance which never comes.  Interestingly enough, the letter closes with a reminder that “riches never come easy or on a platter of gold.”  The people receiving the letter should heed that advice and ignore the letter. It is nothing but a scam and no good will come if you communicate with the sender in any way.  It has been estimated by law enforcement officials that ten thousand of these letters have already been circulated and that as many as six hundred people have fallen for the scam.  That is only 6%, but it is 6% too many.

Scam of the day – June 3, 2014 – A Nigerian letter resurfacing

A common scam that has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam involves an email that you receive that initially appears to offer a large amount of money under various pretenses, such as an inheritance or a bank official who needs your help to move money.  At first the email does not ask for anything from you, but once you respond to the initial communication, more and more money is required from you in order to get the “free” money that was initially promised you.  Many of these scams originate in Nigeria, however, they come from many other places as well.  Here is a copy of one that was in my email today:

“I am David Ellis Head of Inspection Unit United Nations Inspection Agency in Harts field-Jackson International Airport Atlanta, Georgia.  During our investigation, I discovered An abandoned shipment through a Diplomat from United Kingdom which was transferred from JF Kennedy Airport To our facility here in Atlanta, and when scanned it revealed an undisclosed sum of money in 2 Metal Trunk Boxes weighing approximately 110kg each.

The consignment was abandoned because the Content was not properly declared by the consignee as money rather it was declared as personal Effect/classified document to either avoid diversion by the Shipping Agent or confiscation by the relevant authorities. The diplomat’s inability to payfor Non Inspection fees among other things are the reason why the consignment is delayed and abandoned.  By my assessment, each of the boxes contains about $4M or more.They are still left in the airport storage facility till today. The Consignments likeI said are two metal trunk boxes weighing about 110kg each (Internal dimension: W61 x H156 x D73 (cm) effectiveCapacity: 680 L) Approximately.

The details of the consignment including your name and email on the official document from United Nations’ office inLondon where the shipment was tagged as personal effects/classified document is still available with us. As it stands now, you have to reconfirm your Full name, Phone Number, full address so I can cross-check and see if it corresponds with the one on the official documents. It is now left to you to decide if you still need the consignment or allow us repatriate it back to UK (place of origin) as we were instructed.  Like I did say again, the shipper abandoned it and ran away most importantly because he gave a false declaration, he could not pay for the yellow tag, hecould not secure a valid non inspection document(s), etc. I am ready to assist you in any way I can for you to get back this packages provided you will also give me something out of it (financial gratification).  You can either come in person, or you engage the services of a secure shipping/delivery Company/agent that will provide the necessary securityThat is required to deliver the package to your doorstep or the destination of your choice. I need all the guarantee that I can get from you before I can get involved in this project.

Best Regards,

David Ellis INSPECTION OFFICER”

TIPS

This particular Nigerian letter has actually been circulated since 2012.  Greedy people have been falling for it and paying money to scam artists who never provide anything in return.  Anyone receiving such an email knows that they have not actually been involved in such a shipment so their name cannot be legitimately involved in it.  This particular letter is also an example of “too good to be true.”  The shear size of this something for nothing proposition should be enough to let you know that it is a scam.  Finally, by Googling David Ellis Inspection Officer it will be confirmed that this is nothing but a scam.

 

Scam of the day – February 27, 2014 – Another Nigerian letter that isn’t from Nigeria

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received isn’t from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“Dear Friend,
i need your kind attention. I will be very glad if  you do assist me to relocate this sum of ( US$15.Million dollars.) to your bank account for the benefit of our both families.
only i cannot operate it alone without using a Foreigner who will stand as a beneficiary to the money, that is why i decided to contact you in a good manner to assist me and also to share the benefit together with me.
for the sharing of the fund 50/50 base on the fact that it is two man business note that you are not taking any risk because there will be a legal back up document as well which will back the money up into your bank account there in your country.
all i need from you now is to indicating your interest and I will send you the full details on how the business will be executed.
Thanks & Best Regards,
Dr Lahman”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are not very good.