Posts Tagged: ‘Nigerian Letter Scam’

Scam of the day – June 3, 2014 – A Nigerian letter resurfacing

June 3, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

A common scam that has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam involves an email that you receive that initially appears to offer a large amount of money under various pretenses, such as an inheritance or a bank official who needs your help to move money.  At first the email does not ask for anything from you, but once you respond to the initial communication, more and more money is required from you in order to get the “free” money that was initially promised you.  Many of these scams originate in Nigeria, however, they come from many other places as well.  Here is a copy of one that was in my email today:

“I am David Ellis Head of Inspection Unit United Nations Inspection Agency in Harts field-Jackson International Airport Atlanta, Georgia.  During our investigation, I discovered An abandoned shipment through a Diplomat from United Kingdom which was transferred from JF Kennedy Airport To our facility here in Atlanta, and when scanned it revealed an undisclosed sum of money in 2 Metal Trunk Boxes weighing approximately 110kg each.

The consignment was abandoned because the Content was not properly declared by the consignee as money rather it was declared as personal Effect/classified document to either avoid diversion by the Shipping Agent or confiscation by the relevant authorities. The diplomat’s inability to payfor Non Inspection fees among other things are the reason why the consignment is delayed and abandoned.  By my assessment, each of the boxes contains about $4M or more.They are still left in the airport storage facility till today. The Consignments likeI said are two metal trunk boxes weighing about 110kg each (Internal dimension: W61 x H156 x D73 (cm) effectiveCapacity: 680 L) Approximately.

The details of the consignment including your name and email on the official document from United Nations’ office inLondon where the shipment was tagged as personal effects/classified document is still available with us. As it stands now, you have to reconfirm your Full name, Phone Number, full address so I can cross-check and see if it corresponds with the one on the official documents. It is now left to you to decide if you still need the consignment or allow us repatriate it back to UK (place of origin) as we were instructed.  Like I did say again, the shipper abandoned it and ran away most importantly because he gave a false declaration, he could not pay for the yellow tag, hecould not secure a valid non inspection document(s), etc. I am ready to assist you in any way I can for you to get back this packages provided you will also give me something out of it (financial gratification).  You can either come in person, or you engage the services of a secure shipping/delivery Company/agent that will provide the necessary securityThat is required to deliver the package to your doorstep or the destination of your choice. I need all the guarantee that I can get from you before I can get involved in this project.

Best Regards,

David Ellis INSPECTION OFFICER”

TIPS

This particular Nigerian letter has actually been circulated since 2012.  Greedy people have been falling for it and paying money to scam artists who never provide anything in return.  Anyone receiving such an email knows that they have not actually been involved in such a shipment so their name cannot be legitimately involved in it.  This particular letter is also an example of “too good to be true.”  The shear size of this something for nothing proposition should be enough to let you know that it is a scam.  Finally, by Googling David Ellis Inspection Officer it will be confirmed that this is nothing but a scam.

 

Scam of the day – February 27, 2014 – Another Nigerian letter that isn’t from Nigeria

February 27, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received isn’t from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“Dear Friend,
i need your kind attention. I will be very glad if  you do assist me to relocate this sum of ( US$15.Million dollars.) to your bank account for the benefit of our both families.
only i cannot operate it alone without using a Foreigner who will stand as a beneficiary to the money, that is why i decided to contact you in a good manner to assist me and also to share the benefit together with me.
for the sharing of the fund 50/50 base on the fact that it is two man business note that you are not taking any risk because there will be a legal back up document as well which will back the money up into your bank account there in your country.
all i need from you now is to indicating your interest and I will send you the full details on how the business will be executed.
Thanks & Best Regards,
Dr Lahman”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are not very good.

 

Scam of the day – January 8, 2014 – Not all Nigerian emails come from Nigeria

January 8, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received purports to be from Afghanistan, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“DEAR FRIEND, PLEASE ALLOW ME TO INTRODUCE MYSELF.I AM CAPTAIN GREG, IN 4TH BATTALION, 64TH ARMORED REGIMENT UNIT HERE THAT PATROLS THE HELMAND PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN.I AM SEEKING YOUR ASSISTANCE TO EVACUATE THE SUM OF TWENTY FIVE MILLION UNITED STATES DOLLARS TO YOU, AS FAR AS I CAN BE ASSURED THAT IT WILL BE SAFE IN YOUR CARE UNTIL I COMPLETE MY SERVICE HERE. THIS IS NO STOLEN MONEY AND THERE ARE NO DANGERS INVOLVED.GET BACK FOR FULL DETAILS.EMAIL:greg123@r7.com”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.

 

Scam of the day – January 4, 2014 – Iowa lawyer suspended in Nigerian inheritance scam

January 4, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction and today’s scam of the day is just that.  All of us continue to receive emails which we refer to as Nigerian letters even if they don’t always come from Nigeria.  The scam, which actually has been around since the 1500s begins with a communication that you receive informing you that you eligible to receive a large amount of money without having to do anything to qualify to receive the funds.  Often the funds are promised as a part of an inheritance even though you may well know that you have no relatives in Nigeria or wherever the email appears to originate.  Once the victim is hooked with the promise of “free” money, the demands for fees, administrative costs and other payments begin.  Often these payments required in order to get the “free” money end up in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Of course, at the end of the process, the victim receives nothing except an expensive lesson in scams and greed.  Many of us wonder why these scams are still around.  We wonder who could possibly fall for these scams after so much has become known about them.  Well, now we know who falls for this scam – Robert Allan Wright Jr. is an Iowa lawyer whose license to practice law was suspended for one year by the Iowa Supreme Court because he solicited loans from his clients to pay the $177,660 in Nigerian inheritance taxes and “anti-terrorism certificate” required in order to obtain 18.8 million dollars supposedly inherited by one of his other clients.  Of course the entire thing was a scam which should be obvious to anyone, but apparently not to Attorney Wright who, according to the Iowa Supreme Court’s Disciplinary Board “appears to have honestly believed – and continues to believe – that one day a trunk full of … one hundred dollar bills is going to appear upon his office doorstep.”

TIPS

There are no free lunches, nor are there any free inheritances that you are going to receive from Nigeria, particularly if you have had absolutely no connection with anyone in that country.  There also is no such thing as an “anti-terrorism certificate” which would have been clear to anyone who bothered to research the matter.    From time to time, I show you some of the Nigerian letters that I receive in my email on a regular basis so that you can see what the latest incarnations of these scams look like.  Do yourself a favor and never respond to any of these emails.

Scam of the day – December 30, 2013 – Nelson Mandela scams

December 30, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

The recent death of former South African President Nelson Mandela was both a sad occasion due to the loss of this great man, but it was also a time to celebrate a long life well lived.  Unfortunately, it also has turned into an opportunity for scam artists to turn people into scam victims as a number of different Mandela based scams are appearing in emails, text messages and social media.  Although they are all different, most share the same basic format which is that following Mandela’s death, the person receiving the email, text message or other communication is lucky enough to have been chosen to receive a substantial payment from the Mandela estate.  Other scams are tied to the fund raising efforts of the Nelson Mandela Foundation and promise the potential victim a share of the funds raised by or on behalf of the foundation.  Similar to the Nigerian letter scam, the funds which are initially promised to be free and unconditional end up costing the victim large amounts of money for various fees and administrative costs that the victim is told must be paid before the victim can receive his or her funds, which, of course never come.

TIPS

Scammers are always adapting their scams to whatever is newsworthy and is holding the public’s attention.  Again, as always, when you receive any communication offering you free money under any pretext, the first question is why would the person or entity offering you the money randomly choose you.  You should also remember a couple of my mottoes, namely, “if it sounds too good to be true, it is” and “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  In regard to scams directly related to Nelson Mandela, you can check out the website of the Nelson Mandela Foundation which keeps track of the many scams related to the great man’s name.  Here is a link to the foundation’s website with a list of Mandela related scams:

http://www.nelsonmandela.org/content/page/public-scams

Never give money to any scheme until you have confirmed the legitimacy of both the scheme itself and the people involved with it.  Generally, it will not take long to discover that these type of free money offers are nothing more than scams.

Scam of the day – September 23, 2013 – Syrian email scam

September 23, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s “Scam of the day” comes both from my own email box and also the headlines.  although the letter appears to come from General Abdul Aziz Jassem al- Shallal, it is just a scam letter similar to what has come to be known as the “Nigerian letter scam.”  General Abdul Aziz Jassem al-Shallal is a real person and, in fact, did defect from the Syrian army in 2012, however, the real General Aziz Jassem al-Shallal did not send me and the email copied below and if you got one, he did not send one to you either.  The email is typical of the Nigerian letter scam in that it describes a convoluted opportunity for you to acquire huge money at no risk.  In fact, once you are hooked into the scheme, you are then required to provide funds time after time for various costs of completing the transaction and although the victim provides the money repeatedly, the big payoff never comes.  This scheme relies on our greed to blind us to the reality that such schemes are scams.

Here is a copy of the email I received:

“Greetings,
I apologized using this medium to reach you for a transaction/business of this magnitude, but this is due to Confidentiality and prompt access reposed on this medium. In unfolding this proposal, I want to count on you, as a respected and honest person to handle this project/transaction with sincerity, trust and confidentiality.
Let me use this opportunity to introduce myself briefly to you. I am General Abdul Aziz Jassem al-Shallal. One of the general that defected from the Syrian Army.
My office monitors and controls the affairs of sensitive institutions including some financial post in my country concerned with foreign contract payments as well..
I am the final signatory to any transfer or remittance of funds moving within banks both on the local and international levels in line to foreigncontracts settlement. I have before me, list of funds which could not be transferred to some nominated accounts as these accounts have beenidentified either as ghost accounts, unclaimed deposits or over-invoiced sum e.t.c. before I defected.
Now listen carefully please. I write to present you to the federal government that you are among the people expecting the funds to betransferred into their accounts. On this note, I wish to have a deal with you as regards to the unpaid certified contract funds.
I have every file before me and the data’s will be changed into your name to enable you receive the fund into your nominated account as thecontractor/beneficiary of the fund amount $20 Million U.S.D.
It is my duty to recommend the transfer of these surplus funds to the  government treasury and reserve accounts as unclaimed deposits. I have the opportunity to write you based on the opportunity that the funds was release to my office which I have made deposit into three countries France , United States and Britain namely.
Among several others, I have decided to remit this sum following my idea that we have a deal/agreement and I am going to do this legally.
MY CONDITIONS AS FOLLOWS.
1. You will give me 70% at of the total sum as soon as you confirm the total fund in your designated account. 25% will be for you for while 5% should be set aside for any miscellaneous expenses.
2. This transaction must be kept highly secretive as I am still in service to avoid public notice and all correspondence will be strictly by email for security purposes. We will talk on phone partially if any warrant for that.
3. There should be no third parties as most problems associated with fund release are caused by your agents or representative.
If you agree with my conditions, I will intimate you with the procedures to enable me fix your name on the payment schedule instantly to meet the mandate and vital information for you to receive the funds legally from the bank in which country funds has been safely deposited.
I hope you don’t reject this offer as this great opportunity comes but once in one’s entire life.
General Abdul Aziz Jassem al-Shallal.
email:genbdulaziz@yahoo.co.jp”

TIPS

This particular “Nigerian letter scam” relies upon a number of distinguishing factors.  It uses the name of a real person and invokes a scenario regarding Syria, a country in the news that may sound slightly plausible to someone who wants to blind themselves to reality in the hope of a big payday.  You have to ask yourself first, why and how would this general seek me out?  The answer should be sufficient to let you know that it is a scam.   In addition, the letter contains the typical poor grammar that is so often found in these scams that originate in Nigeria and other countries where English is a second language.   Finally,any deal that sounds too good to be true, generally is.  Remember my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”

Scam of the day – August 8, 2013 – Nigerian email scam with a twist

August 8, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

The Nigerian email scam has been with us as long as there has been email.  In fact, the scam is just the latest incarnation of a scam that was used as long ago as the 1500s when it was called the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  By now, hopefully, everyone is familiar with how the scam works.  Under various pretenses, you are promised a huge windfall of money at no cost to you.  However once you have communicated with the scammers, you soon learn that there are various costs to you that suddenly arise for things such as taxes, processing fees, bribes and other reasons.  Many individuals have lost huge sums of money chasing the pot of gold that never comes.

Today’s email, which is reproduced below has an interesting twist.  It promises $15,500,000 allegedly for payment of a scam victim compensation fund even though I have not been victimized by any such scam, however, the twist is that I will be paid through a debit card that I can only use through ATM withdrawals of a maximum of $5,000 per day which means that in order to fully access the funds it would take me more than eight years of daily withdrawals to take out the entire amount.

Here is a copy of the email I received.

United Nation Organization                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Reports & Publications Department                                                                                                                                                                                                                     760 United Nations Plaza,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  New York, NY 10017, USA.

RE: DOCKET NO.   OP 292.

Attn: Sir/Madam,

Fund Beneficiary,

We wish to inform you that your payment valued at US$15,500,000.00 (Fifteen Million Five Hundred Thousand United States Dollars) with the United Nations Security Council and IMF recovered from a Bank in Nigeria as an unpaid Inheritance fund/Scam victim Compensation fund with an accrued interest belonging to you has been approved to be released to you without any delays.

We have mandated the Inter-Switch Card Nigeria Limited to issue you an ATM VISA Debit Card which you will use to withdraw this US$15,500,000.00 from any ATM machine in your country or in any part of the world but the maximum amount you can withdraw in a day should between US$3,000.00 to US$5,000 only.

You are strongly advised to contact the operation manager of Inter-Switch Card Nigeria Limited MR. SAM MBA via his open access email address:  info@interswitch-UBA.zzn.com   OR   auditinfomationngng@yahoo.com      and email him your release code ATMPMT09812 to enable him confirm and send you the ATM VISA Debit Card or do you want it by Bank to Bank transfer?

For more directives.

Lastly you are warned to disregard other contact or any communication you have with other offices regarding this same fund. We are sorry for the plight you have gone through in the past.

Thanks for adhering to this instructions.

Yours Sincerely,

MR. Kiyotaka Akasaka

Public Information Officer”

TIPS

As always, you should never respond to one of these emails because if you do, you only alert the scammer that they have a real person with whom they are dealing.  You don’t get something for nothing.  You don’t win contests that you have not entered and you do not get compensation from victims’ funds where you have not been a victim.  By the way, the real Kiyotaka Akasaka is a United Nations diplomat.  The real Kiyotaka Akasaka is not involved in anyway with this scam.

Send me your favorite Nigerian scam letters that you receive and we will include them on Scamicide.

 

Scam of the day – August 1, 2013 – Nigerian letter with a twist

August 1, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Just when you think you have seen everything about the Nigerian email where you receive an email telling you about any of a number of different pretenses under which you are can receive a huge windfall of cash only to learn later, once you are hooked into the scheme that you are required to pay fees and costs that mount up until you end up losing thousands of dollars and get nothing in return, there is a new twist.  Below you will find a copy of a Nigerian email I recently received that states with incredible chutzpah that previous emails I had been sent from Nigerian promising riches were phony, but that this email is the only legitimate one to provide me with 1.5 million dollars and all I need to do is pay a small $270 inspection waiver fee.  Included with the email I received is a copy of another email purportedly from a woman name Connie Dutton of Silver Springs Florida who recounts in her email about how she had been taken advantage of in the past, but now through this particular program (in reality, scam) she received 1.5 million dollars.  This is a great new twist on the old scam, but is just as much a fraud as every other Nigerian email you receive.  If you send the money requested all you will succeed in doing is losing money.

Here is a copy of the email and the attached email allegedly from Connie Dutton.  By the way, if you Google Connie Dutton, you will find that this scam email has been around for more than a year.

 

BARRISTER  GEORGE ALEX & CO. LAW CHAMBERS
LEGAL PRACTITIONER & NOTARY PUBLIC HIGH COURT
REPRESENTATIVE OF  COMPENSATION AWARD HOUSE
AND FEDERAL MINISTRY OF FINANCE NIGERIA
SUITE 202 OMEGA PLAZA LAGOS NIGERIA

Attn: Ms;ERLA MAMATHA

Thank you for Contacting Barrister George Alex and chambers
Associate, Your message and information’s therein was duly noted and I
Have carefully read your email on the transfer of your compensation  funds.

I want you to understand that you have been dealing with a wrong People and
office in the past and I want to state it clear to you that there is
only one office in Africa in charge of compensation Payment and
refunding lost fund which is the COMPENSATION AWARDS HOUSE  which I
work for, it is an affiliation to all Ministry of finances hear in Africa .

However, I want you to understand that for the fact that a lot of
Foreign beneficiaries has lost so much money why contacting this wrong
People and offices in trying to get their Inheritance compensation
funds , We the Compensation house in collaboration with  the Federal Ministry of
Finance Nigeria has therefore implemented a new Method / mode of
conduct for beneficiaries to receive their payment,

Without having to pay any huge amount of money and this implies the
Provision of INSPECTION WAIVER OPTION CERTIFICATE that can be secured
From the Federal Treasury Board (FTB). This inspection waiver
Certificate is an authoritative order the transfer of your funds, to be
Release payment worth $1.5 Million US Dollars to be transfer to you
Immediately and you will receive your funds in two working Days
(48hours) for you to confirm the transfer of your Funds worth the sum of
$1.5 Million US Dollars.

Many foreign benefactors have received their payment by means of
Procuring this inspection waiver which cost $270USD only, therefore i will
Advice you to get this inspection waiver today and your funds must be
Released to you within 48hrs.As a matter of fact, you have made a
Better choice by contacting this office.

Yes a woman Named Mrs Connie Dutton  were in our office some weeks ago
for her funds and I am the one that help her in seeing that her
funds is be Release and transferred to her  and I am willing to help you in this
transfer and I assure you of efficient Service in future.
.

As soon as you send this $270 fee which is the only fee need to be
send by you and once you make the payment I shall proceed to procure
the inspection waiver immediately and  commence to file this
evidence to The transfer of your funds  for the immediate transfer exercise of
your fund as agreed without further delay.

I await your E-mail
Thank you for your cooperation.
BARRISTER  GEORGE ALEX &
CO. LAW CHAMBERS
Email: bargeorgealex009@gmail.com
Telephone  : +234- 8060-558-873

 

On Sat, Jul 20, 2013 at 4:52 AM, Mrs Connie Dutton. <Sale@camphacement.vn> wrote:

Attn: My Dear,

I am Mrs Connie Dutton, I am a US citizen, 51 years Old. I reside here in Silver Springs Florida. My residential address is as follows. 7008 E Hwy 326 Silver Springs FLorida 34488, United States, am thinking of relocating since I am now rich. I am one of those that took part in the Compensation in Nigeria many years ago and they refused to pay me, I had paid over US$20,000 while in the US, trying to get my payment all to no avail.

So I decided to travel down to Nigeria with all my compensation documents, And I was directed to meet Barrister George Alex, who is the member of COMPENSATION AWARD COMMITTEE, and I contacted him and he explained everything to me. He said whoever is contacting us through emails are fake.

He took me to the paying bank for the claim of my Compensation payment. Right now I am the most happiest woman on earth because I have received my compensation funds of $1,500,000.00 Moreover, Barrister George Alex, showed me the full information of those that are yet to receive their payments and I saw your email address as one of the beneficiaries, that is why I decided to email you to stop dealing with those people, they are not with your fund, they are only making money out of you. I will advise you to contact Barrister George Alex.

You have to contact him directly on this information below.

COMPENSATION AWARD HOUSE
Name : Barrister George Alex(Esq)
Email: barristergeorgealex@yahoo.cn

You really have to stop dealing with those people that are contacting you and telling you that your fund is with them, it is not in anyway with them, they are only taking advantage of you and they will dry you up until you have nothing.

The only money I paid after I met Barrister George Alex was just US$270 for the paper works, take note of that.

As soon as you contact him he will send you the payment information which you are to use in sending the payment to him in order for him to obtain the document from the court of law there in Nigeria so that your fund can be transfer to you without any delay just the way mine was being transfer to me.

Send him the following details if you know you are ready to have your FUNDS so that as soon as he receive your information he will send to you the payment details for sending him the $270USD that is needed for him to get the document that is needed to make the transfer a successful one and that is that only payment i made to Barrister George Alex and he help me in the transfering of my FUNDS and i most say that you have to countact him so that he will help you the way he help me to Get my FUNDS without any further payment.

Fill Out the information to him if you are ready to get your FUNDS

Your Full Name:……………
Direct Phone:………………..
Country……………..
Occupation:………………...
Gender:………
Age:…………..

Once again stop contacting those people, I will advise you to contact Barrister George Alex so that he can help you to Deliver your fund instead of dealing with those liars that will be turning you around asking for different kind of money to complete your transaction.

Thank You and Be Blessed.

Mrs Connie Dutton.
7008 E Hwy 326 Silver Springs
FLorida 34488, United States

TIPS

If it sounds too good to be true, it generally is and as I always say, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  Certainly you should be incredibly skeptical if you get an email from anyone promising you riches for little or no effort or cost on your part, but if you get such an email from Nigeria, you should delete the email immediately.  You should always ask yourself, why am I being singled out to receive a huge amount of money?  The answer is obvious.  The email is just a broadly sent scam.

Scam of the day – July 10, 2013 – New Nigerian letter scam

July 10, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s “Scam of the day” comes directly from my own email inbox and is another example of what has come to be called the Nigerian letter whether or not the email originates in Nigeria or not.  A copy of the email is reproduced below.  The gist of these letters is always the same.  You are contacted by someone who tells you that under any of a number of different pretexts you can receive a large sum of money without having to do anything.  Unfortunately, the truth is that the email is just a trap.  Once you respond, you are then told that you must provide funds for processing, taxes, bribes or any other number of reasons.  Ultimately, you get nothing and you lose the money you have advanced.

“Good day to you.
I know that it will be a surprise to you to receive this message,I just arrive
in State this morning and I want to let you know that the Ministry trust fund
issue an Atm Visa Card worth of$2.5Million USD on your favor.Right now am in
Atlantic City  INT’L AIRPORT IN NEW JERSEY please do call me now with your
full contact details.My Email : ddiplomdaviddiplom@rocketmail.com
Phone: 862-234-6548.
Diplomat Agent Richard Peterson”

TIPS

As often is the case, many of these Nigerian letters originate either in Nigeria or some other foreign country where English is not the primary language, which may account for the poor grammar.  By the way, I Googled “Richard Peterson” and found that his name has been tied to similar Nigerian letters that have been circulating since at least 2011.  If one of these emails appears in your inbox the only thing you should do is immediately delete it.  Nothing good can come of any contact you might make with these scammers. And for those of you who wonder who might still be falling for these obvious scams, the answer is many people, as the amount of money lost to the Nigerian letter scams each year totals more than ten billion dollars.

Scam of the day – May 9, 2013 – Latest Nigerian letter scam

May 9, 2013 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

I want to share with you as today’s “scam of the day” a scam email that was sent to me a couple of days ago.  It is the latest variation of the Nigerian letter scam.  We are all familiar with the Nigerian letter scam in which under various pretexts you are told that you can receive a large sum of money without any risk and without having to do anything of substance.  It may appeal to our greed and desire for easy riches, but it also should make alarms go off in our heads that this offer is obviously bogus and too good to be true.  This particular incarnation of the letter has a number of red flags that should make you skeptical of similar letters that you may receive.  First is the poor grammar.   Many of these emails originate in foreign countries such as Nigeria where English is a second language, but where official letters still should contain better grammar.  This particular letter never indicates why I should be receiving funds from a murdered family in Syria.   Also interesting is the asking about my profession, particularly because one would think that there would be a screening process for any legitimate offer.    As with all of these types of scams, if you respond, you will be told that some funds are needed for administrative costs, legal fees, bribes or whatever and the amount keeps increasing once you pay them anything.  Ultimately, you receive nothing and lose any money you send to the scammer.  These Nigerian letters still are common because they still work. Don’t be one of their victims.

Here is a copy of the email I received.

 “VERY URGENT AND CONFIDENTIAL

 

Date :mardi 07 mai 2013
20h00 – 21h00 (GMT+00:00)
De :ibrahimzongo21@yahoo.frMail :From Mr.Ibrahim Zongo.
The Head of File and Auditing Department.
United Bank of Africa (U.B.A).
In West Africa Country
Email:ibrahimzongo21@yahoo.fr
Email:ibrahimzongo21@aol.frTOP SECRET
REMITTANCE OF US$15,200,000.00 CONFIDENTIAL IS THE CASE.This message might meet you in utmost surprise; however, it’s just my Urgent need for foreign partner that made me to contact you for this transaction. I am a banker by profession from West Africa and currently holding the post of director Auditing and accounting unit of the bank.I have the opportunity of transferring the left over Funds ($15.2 million) of one of our bank clients who murdered with his entire family in Syria. Hence; I am inviting you for a business deal where this money can be shared between us in the ratio of 60/40. I will like to inform you that this transaction is 100% risk free, while further details of the transfer will be forwarded to you as soon as I receive your return mail. Your Urgent response is needed for immediate transfer of this fund into your account.what is your profession? send your mobile number for discuss.Note that this transaction will never in any way harm or foiled your good post or reputation in your country, because everything will follow legal process.I am looking forward to hear from you soonest.Yours faithfully,

Mr.Ibrahim Zongo

 
 
TIPS
 
Never respond to such an email.  Outside of the initial skepticism that should have you remembering that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is, you should also be skeptical of any such ridiculously easy way to get money.  You also should wonder as to why you were chosen to receive such an email.  Although all of these emails are scams, if you want confirmation you can contact me here at Scamicide with a copy of any such email you receive and I can definitively tell you whether the email is a scam.  You also can check with your local police, State Attorney General or the Federal Trade Commission