Scam of the day – August 7, 2017 – Another twist on the Nigerian letter scam

Although it may seem as if the Nigerian letter scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the Nigerian email scam of today is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner con.”  At that time, a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In  the present day incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money under various guises such as assisting a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below deals with undisclosed reasons for transferring money outside of the country.

What all of these scams have in common is that as soon as you contact the scammer, they start asking you to provide money for a variety of purposes and regardless of how much money you pay, you never receive anything.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

“Dear Good FriendI am Mr. Abdoul Issouf ,I work for BOA Bank Ouagadougou Burkina Faso,
I have a business proposal which concerns the transfer of ($13.5
Million US Dollars) into a foreign account. Everything about this
transaction shall be legally done without any problem. If you are
interested to help me, I will give you more details as soon as I
receive your positive response. You will be entitled to 40%, and 60%
will be for me,. If you are willing to Work with me, send me your
reply Immediately with your Age and your Nationality and your Name
and your Occupation and your Private Telephone Numbers?Thanks
Mr. Abdoul Issouf
BOA (D.R.T) Bank Of Africa”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so ridiculous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note that the salutation does not even indicate to whom the email is being sent.  Instead, the lazy scammer merely addresses it as “Dear Good Friend” Never  reply to emails such as this.    If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

 

Scam of the day – June 24, 2017 – Inheritance email scam

The Nigerian letter scam by which you are promised huge amounts of money through an email under various guises, such as an inheritance from a relative you never knew existed or a public official who needs help getting money out of his country, is a scam that has actually been around since the 1500s when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner scam.  While the scam promises money for nothing,  the truth is once you start communicating with the scammer, you are asked to pay one fee after another.  One thing that this scam has in common in all of its incarnations is that if you respond to the scam, you will not end up getting anything except a lesson in learning to be more skeptical.  Many people have paid thousands of dollars to Nigerian letter scam artists before they realize that they have been the victim of a scam.

I don’t publish every one of these types of letters that I receive, but I wanted to share this new version of the letter that Scamicide reader Marty Kenney received earlier this week.

“Good Day.
We wish to notify you again that you were listed as beneficiary to the total
sum US$9 of Million only in the intent of the deceased. On my first email I
mentioned about my late client whose relatives I cannot get in touch with.
But both of you have the same last name so it will be very easy to front you as his official next of kin. I am compelled to do this because I would not want the finance house to push my clients funds into their treasury as
unclaimed inheritance.

We contacted you because you bear the Last name with our Late Client and
therefore can present you as the Beneficiary to the inheritance since there
is no written WILL or Bequest.Our legal services aim to provide our private
clients with a complete service. We are happy to set-up all modalities and
administer Trusts,carry out the administration of estates. All the papers
will be processed in your acceptance of this Transaction.

Note that you are to furnishing me with the requested information’s below
immediately;

(1)Full names.
(2)Contact address.
(3)Telephone and fax numbers.
(4)Location.

If you are interested do let me know so that I can give you Comprehensive
details on what we are to do. Waiting for your response.

Yours faithfully,

Barr. Philip Mark”

 

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so outrageous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  You may also pick up on grammatical errors, such as “Note that you are to furnishing me” in the email which is often an indication of a scam perpetrated by someone whose primary language is not English.  The name of the lawyer used in the email of Philip Mark is a name that appears in many Nigerian email scams.  Another indication that this is a scam is that the salutation is not directed to you by name.  In fact, this particular email was sent as a mass email mailing to many people who did not, as indicated in the email, share the same name.

If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – January 13, 3017 – A new version of the Nigerian letter

Although it may seem as if this scam only began in earnest with the invention of email, in fact, the Nigerian email scam of today is just a variation of a scam that is more than four hundred years old when it was called “the Spanish Prisoner con.  At that time, a letter was sent to the targeted victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to help raise money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised, would reward the money-contributing victim with great sums of money and, in some versions of the con, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In one of the present day typical incarnations of this scam, you receive an email in which you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Other variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official who is trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The email which I received recently and is copied below deals with abandoned property.

What all of these scams have in common is that as soon as you contact the scammer, the need for you  to provide fees for a variety of purposes becomes apparent and regardless of how much money you pay, you never receive anything.

Here is a copy of the email I recently received:

 

“Good Day!

I am contacting you regarding a special cargo that has been abandoned here at our warehouse for over a period of 2 years and when scanned, it revealed an undisclosed sum of money in it. From my findings, the cargo originated from Europe and the content was not declared as money by the consignor in order to avoid diversion by the shipping agent, and also failure to pay the special cargo non-inspection fee of 3,475  . I strongly believe the box will contain about 4.6 million or more.

In my private search for a reliable person, my proposal now is to present you as the recipient of the cargo since the shipper has abandoned it which is a possibility due to the fact it has been abandoned for a period whereby a new beneficiary can be presented to the clearance department for claim and also my position at this shipping service. I will pay for the fee and arrange for the cargo to be delivered to your address. Alternatively, I can personally bring it myself and then we share the total money in the box equally.

Regards,

Mr. Lewis Hawkins
Asst. Operations Manager
ZIM Integrated Shipping Services Ltd
Chicago (IL) Agents: 9950 W.Lawrence Avenue,
Suite 215 Schiller Park, IL 60176”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so ridiculous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note that the salutation does not even indicate to whom the email is being sent.  Instead, the lazy scammer merely addresses it as “Good day! ” Never  reply to emails such as this.     If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – July 19, 2016 – Another version of the Nigerian scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes from the email of a Scamicide reader.   I am sure that the same email has been sent to many of you, as well.  This is just another version of the Nigerian email scam.  Although it may seem that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The example below of the email  received by a Scamicide reader whose name I have crossed out involves “donating” money to the recipient of the email for charitable purposes.   Although generally, you are told initially in these scams that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never gets anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email recently received by a Scamicide reader:

“Dear  XXXXXX,

I got your details after an extensive on-line search Via (Network Power Charitable Trust) for a reliable person, I’m Mrs.Rose Duggan, 61 years old dying woman who was diagnosed for cancer about 4 years ago,I have decided to donate ($10,500,000.00) to you for charitable goals.Contact me if you are interested in carrying out this task, so that i can arrange the release of the funds to you.

Thank you and God bless you.
Mrs.Rose Duggan”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself if you receive such an email is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to be gullible enough to fall prey to the scam.

Scam of the day – December 13, 2015 – A new version of the Nigerian email scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you, as well.  This is just another version of the Nigerian email scam although this one appears to have originated in Ghana.   Although it may seem that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  The example below of the email I received involves a shady consignment deal.  Although generally, you are told initially that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“I am B. Komeng, Director, Aviation Security (GHANA AIRPORT COMPANY) in Greater Accra field International Airport West Africa, During one of my investigation I discovered An abandoned shipment of two Metallic Trunk Boxes that was transferred from US International Airport (JFK) back to our Airport facility here in Accra Ghana and when scanned it revealed an undisclosed Funds and about 50Kilos of Gold in Metal Trunk Boxes weighing approximately 50 and 40kg each. These consignments was abandoned because the Content was not properly declared by the delivery shipping agent as above mentioned items rather it was declared as personal effect to avoid diversion and tax. On my assumption, the very box that contains Funds amounted US$5.Five Million United States of American Dollars and the consignments are still left in the Storage House till today. Friend, I want you and I to transact this deal together and share the profit together since the shipper has abandoned it and ran away due to improper declaration and improper documentation. I want front you as the beneficiary and Consignee to these boxes, As you can see, I am still an officer with airport company, I cannot be found to be associated with these consignment hence I cannot call for its delivery, if it is discovered that I have a particular interest in these consignments, it will be seized by Government indefinitely. I can arrange for the boxes to be moved out of this Airport to your address if you agreed to accept the delivery and we work together in procuring necessary legal paperwork to back you up as the legal beneficiary, once we are through I will deploy the services of a secured shipping Company geared to provide the security it needs to deliver these consignments to your address. I am willing to work with you on the understanding of a partnership basis, We shall share the profit 50% 50% upon the completion of this transaction, I can assure you of no trouble in this transaction and my guarantee to you is that we can actualize our goal within four working days if we can work in one accord also to be honest with you, we can only work in partnership to realize this goal, reasons being that as I have stated above to you that one of the very crucial reasons why they agent failed in having the consignments delivered was due to the improper documentation. Thanks. B. Komeng.”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are often not good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

 

Scam of the day – July 17, 2015 – Yet another Nigerian email scam

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

Today’s scam of the day is yet another variation of what has come to be known as the Nigerian letter scam.  In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received may not even be from Nigeria, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told initially that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

Dear Friend,
With due respect to your person and much sincerity of purpose . I have a business proposal which I will like to handle with you. $35 million USD is involves. But be rest assured that everything is legal and risk free as I have concluded all the arrangements and the legal papers that will back the transaction up. Kindly indicate your interest as to enable me tell you more detail of the proposal.
Waiting for your urgent response.
Yours Faithfully,
Dr.Lincoln Bah Bah

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.  As with many such scams, which are originating outside of the United States, the punctuation and grammar are often not good.

Many people wonder why cybercriminals and scammers send out such ridiculously obvious scam letters that anyone with an ounce of sense would recognize as a scam, but that may be intentional on the part of the scammer because if someone responds to such an obvious scam, they are more likely to fall prey to the scam.

Scam of the day – July 2, 2015 – A new Nigerian letter scam

The Nigerian letter scam by which you are promised huge amounts of money through an email under various guises, such as an inheritance from a relative you never knew existed or a public official who needs help getting money out of his country is a scam that has actually been around since the 1500s when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner scam.  One thing that this scam has in common in all of its incarnations is that if you respond to the scam, you will not end up getting anything except a lesson in learning to be more skeptical.  Many people have paid thousands of dollars to Nigerian letter scam artists before they realize that they have been the victim of a scam.

I don’t publish every one of these types of letters that I receive, but I wanted to share this particularly creative version of the letter that I got last week.

“Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Anti-Terrorist And Monitory Crime Division.
Federal Bureau Of Investigation.
INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUNDS
J.Edgar.Hoover Building Washington Dc
Customers Service Hours / Monday To Saturday
Office Hours Monday to Saturday:

Dear Beneficiary,

Series of meetings have been held over the past 7 months with the secretary general of the United Nations Organization. This ended 3 days ago. It is obvious that you have not received your fund which is to the tune of $2.3million Usd due to past corrupt Governmental Officials who almost held the fund to themselves for their selfish reason and some individuals who have taken advantage of your fund all in an attempt to swindle your fund which has led to so many losses from your end and unnecessary delay in the receipt of your fund.

The National Central Bureau of Interpol enhanced by the United Nations and Federal Bureau of Investigation and the International monetary funds have successfully passed a mandate to the current president of Nigeria his Excellency President Good luck Jonathan to boost the exercise of clearing all foreign debts owed to you and other individuals and organizations who have been found not to have receive their Contract Sum, Lottery/Gambling, Inheritance and the likes. Now how would you like to receive your payment? Because we have two method of payment which is by Check or by ATM card?
ATM Card: We will be issuing you a custom pin based ATM card which you will use to withdraw up to $3,000 per day from any ATM machine that has the Master Card Logo on it and the card have to be renewed in 4 years time which is 2015. Also with the ATM card you will be able to transfer your funds to your local bank account. The ATM card comes with a handbook or manual to enlighten you about how to use it. Even if you do not have a bank account.

Check: To be deposited in your bank for it to be cleared within three working days. Your payment would be sent to you via any of your preferred option and would be mailed to you via UPS. Because we have signed a contract with UPS which should expire in the next three weeks you will only need to pay $280 instead of $620 saving you $340 So if you pay before the three weeks you save $340 Take note that anyone asking you for some kind of money above the usual fee is definitely a fraudsters and you will have to stop any communication with every other person if you have been in contact with any. Also remember that all you will ever have to spend is $280.00 nothing more!
Nothing less! And we guarantee the receipt of your fund to be successfully delivered to you within the next 24hrs after the receipt of payment has been confirmed.

Note: Everything has been taken care of by the Federal Government of Nigeria the International Monetary Funds, The United Nation and also the FBI and including taxes, custom paper and clearance duty so all you will ever need to pay is $280.

DO NOT SEND MONEY TO ANYONE UNTIL YOU READ THIS: The actual fees for shipping your ATM card is $420 but because UPS have temporarily discontinued the C.O.D which gives you the chance to pay when package is delivered for international shipping We had to sign contract with them for bulk shipping which makes the fees reduce from the actual fee of $620 to $280 nothing more and no hidden fees of any sort!

To effect the release of your fund valued at $2.3million Usd you are advised to contact our correspondent in Africa the delivery officer Mr Nicholas Justina with the information below,

Full Name:Mr Nicholas Justina
Email: nicholas_justina@aol.com
Email:nicholasjustina2@gmail.com
Telephone: (719) 377-2771
You are advised to contact him with the informations as stated below:

Your full Name..
Your Address:…………..
Home/Cell Phone:…………..
Occupation:………………..
Preferred Payment Method (ATM / Cashier Check)

Upon receipt of payment the delivery officer will ensure that your package is sent within 24 working hours. Because we are so sure of everything we are giving you a 100% money back guarantee if you do not receive payment/package within the next 24hrs after you have made the payment for shipping.

Yours sincerely,
Miss Donna Story
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20535”

TIPS

Although it should be apparent to everyone who reads this email that it is a scam, the very outrageousness of  the email is most likely intentional because as more people become aware of the Nigerian letter scam, the scammers do not want to waste their time on potential victims who may be skeptical of their scam, so they often send out emails like these that are so outrageous in an effort to catch only the most gullible and greedy.  Also note the misspelling of the word “monetary” that appears as “monitory crime commission.”  Of course, by the fact that you are reading Scamicide, you have already indicated that you are too smart to fall for this type of scam.  If you receive a particularly inventive or interesting Nigerian email, please share it with us here at Scamicide.

Scam of the day – March 27, 2015 – Another Nigerian letter scam

As we all know by now, the Nigerian letter scam is the name for a type of scam in which you are told that under some pretense you are to receive a huge amount of money for doing next to nothing.  Of course, once you correspond with the sender of the email, you soon learn that it takes payment after payment from you under various guises in order to receive the money and, of course, ultimately, you receive nothing, but the scammer has managed to trick you out of your money.  Here is a copy of such an email that I recently received:

“Dear Friend ,

How are you? I am sorry but happy to inform you about my success in getting those funds transferred under the co-operation of a new partner from Kosovo though I tried my best to involve you in the business but God decided the whole situations.  Presently I am in Kosovo for investment projects with my own share of the total sum. Meanwhile, I did not forget your past efforts and attempts to assist me in transferring those funds despite that it failed us somehow.

Now contact my little friend in South Africa his name is. Mr. Betrand Thando On his e-mail address; mr.betrandthando@yahoo.com  Ask him to send you the total sum of $400.000.00 (four hundred thousand usd) which i kept for your compensation for all the past efforts and attempts to assist me in this matter. I appreciated your efforts at that time very much. So feel free and get in touch with my little friend. And instruct him where to send the amount to you. Please do let me know immediately you receive it so that we can share the joy after all the sufferness at that time.  In the moment, I am very busy here because of the investment projects which I and the new partner are having at hand, finally, remember that I had forwarded instruction to my friend on your behalf to receive that money, so feel free to get in touch with him he will send the amount to you without any delay.

Thanks,
Miss. Bea.”

TIPS

This email is typical of many others and filled with poor grammar and punctuation.  In this case, the letter even speaks of previous dealings which certainly cannot be true. The story is utterly preposterous.  So who would possibly fall for this?  Only the truly gullible and that is the very strategy used by these scammers.  They do not want to waste their time on people who might eventually see through their scam so they make their plea as outrageous as possible so that if someone takes the bait, they are likely to be able to cheat that person out of their money.

By now, we all know that no one is giving you something for nothing and even the most gullible among us must ask themselves, why they were singled out for such good fortune.  The answer is that this is a scam and the best thing you can do is to enjoy the humor of these emails, but never respond to them

Scam of the day – November 20, 2014 – Why are Nigerian email scams so absurd?

Not all Nigerian email scams come from Nigeria although Nigeria is still a hub for this type of scam in which you are told that under some pretense you are to receive a huge amount of money for nothing.  Of course, once you correspond with the sender of the email, you soon learn that it takes payment after payment from you under various guises in order to receive the money and, of course, ultimately, you receive nothing, but the scammer has managed to trick you out of your money.  Here is a copy of such an email that I recently received:

“May God touch your heart as you read this message. I know this maybe a surprise to you but i want you to consider me as a friend because my mind choose you. My name is Waleed Hassan, a retired Oil Merchant from Tripoli, Libya. I am currently in a hospital suffering from the cancer of the lung as i write this message to you. I am a blessed man, but my life has been one of hardship and suffering because of bad health. suicide in my case is not the answer. I suffered the death of family and loved ones, due to the battle that went between the Gaddafi soldiers and the Independent Rebels in my country. My condition is really deteriorating and according to my doctors in all indication regards to medical analysis, it is quite obvious that i may not live for more than 2months. This is because the cancer has gotten to a very bad stage.

Presently I am contacting you because of the funds i lodge with the HSBC BANK when i was still working in England. I choosed from my mind to entrust this amount to a stranger and my mind choose you among different profiles that i have just viewed.

Once the money is transferred to you, i want you to keep 15% of the money for yourself and help me distribute the rest 85% to the street kids, charity organisations and different poor homes. The fund is currently with the HSBC BANK and upon my instruction, it will immediately be transferred to you. If you feel honoured to do the good work for me, Please kindly reply on my Private Email so i can further this with you: haswaled@gmail.com”

This email is typical of many others and filled with poor grammar and spelling errors and of course the story is utterly preposterous.  So who would possibly fall for this?  Only the truly gullible and that is the very strategy used by these scammers.  They do not want to waste their time on people who might eventually see through their scam so they make their plea as outrageous as possible so that if someone takes the bait, they are likely to be able to cheat that person out of their money.

TIPS

By now, we all know that no one is giving you something for nothing and even the most gullible among us must ask themselves, why they were singled out for such good fortune.  The answer is that this is a scam and the best thing you can do is to enjoy the humor of these emails, but never respond to them.

Scam of the day – January 8, 2014 – Not all Nigerian emails come from Nigeria

Today’s Scam of the day comes right from my email and I am sure that it has appeared in the email boxes of many of you.  Although it may appear that the Nigerian email scam began in the era of the Internet, the basis of the scam actually goes back to 1588 when it was known as the Spanish Prisoner Scam.  In those days, a letter was sent to the victim purportedly from someone on behalf of a wealthy aristocrat who was imprisoned in Spain under a false name.  The identity of the nobleman was not revealed for security reasons, but the victim was asked to provide money to obtain the release of the aristocrat, who, it was promised would reward the money-contributing  victim with great sums of money and, in some circumstances, the Spanish prisoner’s beautiful daughter in marriage.

In the various versions of this scam circulating on the Internet today, you are promised great sums of money if you assist a Nigerian in his effort to transfer money out of his country.  Variations include the movement of embezzled funds by corrupt officials, a dying gentleman who wants to make charitable gifts or a minor bank official trying to move the money of deceased foreigners out of his bank without the government taking it.  the example below of the email I received purports to be from Afghanistan, but the scam is the same.  Although generally, you are told that you do not need to contribute anything financially to the endeavor, you soon learn that it is necessary for you to contribute continuing large amounts of money for various reasons, such as various fees, bribes, insurance or taxes before you can get anything.  Of course, the victim ends up contributing money to the scammer, but never receives anything in return.

Here is a copy of the email, I recently received:

“DEAR FRIEND, PLEASE ALLOW ME TO INTRODUCE MYSELF.I AM CAPTAIN GREG, IN 4TH BATTALION, 64TH ARMORED REGIMENT UNIT HERE THAT PATROLS THE HELMAND PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN.I AM SEEKING YOUR ASSISTANCE TO EVACUATE THE SUM OF TWENTY FIVE MILLION UNITED STATES DOLLARS TO YOU, AS FAR AS I CAN BE ASSURED THAT IT WILL BE SAFE IN YOUR CARE UNTIL I COMPLETE MY SERVICE HERE. THIS IS NO STOLEN MONEY AND THERE ARE NO DANGERS INVOLVED.GET BACK FOR FULL DETAILS.EMAIL:greg123@r7.com”

TIPS

This is a simple scam to avoid.  It preys upon people whose greed overcomes their good sense.  The first thing you should ask yourself is why would you be singled out to be so lucky to be asked to participate in this arrangement.  Since there is no good answer to that question, you should merely hit delete and be happy that you avoided a scam.