Posts Tagged: ‘keystroke logging malware’

Scam of the day – August 26, 2015 – Bank of America security message scam

August 26, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

This is another phishing scam that is making the rounds these days.  It appears to be a legitimate email from Bank of America informing you that due to upgrades being done to the Bank of America computer systems, it is necessary for you to confirm personal account information in order to maintain your account.  Of course, if you click on the link contained in the email, you will only succeed in either unwittingly downloading keystroke logging malware that will steal your personal information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft or you will be sent to another website that prompts you to provide your personal information directly, which then wil be used to make you a victim of identity theft.  Either way you lose.  Here is a copy of the email presently being circulated:

“Member:

We need you to confirm your Bank of America account due to our new upgrading. It is mandatory that you confirm your details through our secure link below.

CONNECT
Thank you for your co-operation.
Bank of America Admin
Copyright © 2015 BOA Inc.”

TIPS

There are a number of ways to know that this is a phishing scam.  First of all, if you are not an account holder at Bank of America, you can rest assured that the email is a scam.  Unfortunately, there are so many people that are account holders at Bank of America, the scammers just send out the email in large numbers hoping to reach Bank of America account holders among the random people being sent the email.  The email address from which it is sent was not that of Bank of America, but rather that of a private individual whose email account was hacked, taken over and made part of a botnet to send these emails in large numbers.  Because you can never be sure whenever you receive an email that asks you to provide personal information whether it is legitimate or not, the best thing to do is to remember my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone” and confirm whether it is legitimate or not by calling the real company, in this case Bank of America to learn whether or not the email is phony or not.  Chances are, you will be told that it is a scam.

Scam of the day – August 24, 2015 – Plenty of Fish dating site hacked

August 24, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Plenty of Fish (pof.com) an online dating website with more than a hundred million members had its website corrupted by hackers who managed to install a keystroke logging malware program known as Tinba that enables the identity thieves to steal credit card and banking information from its victims.  What makes this hacking particularly noteworthy is that the hackers did not hack into the computers of Plenty of Fish to install malware as was done in the recent hacking of Ashley Madison.  Instead, they hacked into the computers of a legitimate advertising company, Improve Digital that distributed online advertisements to Plenty of Fish.  The malware was attached to legitimate online advertisements placed by Improve Digital on the Plenty of Fish website.  And as I always say, “things aren’t as bad as you think, they are worse.”  In this case, it was not even necessary for someone visiting the Plenty of Fish website to click on the infected advertisements to permit the malware to be downloaded on to their computers.  All that was necessary was to merely go to the now infected website to have  your computer, in turn, infected with this dangerous malware.

TIPS

If you are a user of Plenty of Fish, you should monitor your bank accounts and credit card accounts closely.  You also would be wise, if you already have not done so, to put a credit freeze on your credit report.  You can find information as to how to do this here on Scamicide.  Just go to the archives and enter the words “credit freeze.”  You also should make sure that you are using the latest anti-virus and anti-malware software on your computer and run a scan for any viruses or malware.

Scam of the day – July 12, 2015 – New Amazon email scam

July 12, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Copied below is an email currently being circulated that is a good example of a social engineering phishing email designed to either get you to provide personal information or to click on a link that will download keystroke logging malware on your computer that will result in your data being stolen and used to make you a victim of identity theft.  The email appears to be an email from Amazon indicating that there is a problem with your account.  In order to remedy the problem, you are prompted to click on a link and either provide the requested personal information or just by clicking on the link you may unwittingly download the keystroke logging malware.  This type of phishing email is so effective because it looks so legitimate.  It also has a higher chance of being effective merely because so many people who receive it will indeed be Amazon customers.

Here is a copy of the email:  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK.

Amazon

Confirm your Amazon account.

Hello ,

We were unable to process your most recent payment. Did you recently change your bank, phone number or credit card?.
To ensure that your service is not interrupted, please update your billing information today.

Or contact Amazon Member Services Team. We’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
If you have recently updated your billing information, please disregard this message as we are processing the changes you have made.

f you need further assistance with your order.

Sincerely,
Amazon

This email was sent by an automated system, so if you reply, nobody will see it. To get in touch with us, log in to your account and click “Contact Us” at the bottom of any page.

Copyright Å  2014 amzon, Inc. All rights reserved. amzon is located at 2211 N. First St., San Jose, CA 95131.

TIPS

There are a number of telltale signs that this is a scam.  First and foremost, the email address from which it was sent has no relation to Amazon.  Also, the salutation does not refer to the person receiving the email by name.  Finally, there are some misspellings and typographical errors in the email.  However, the quality of this phishing email certainly is good, which is why it is so dangerous.  The key to avoiding becoming a victim of this type of social engineering phishing scam is to follow my motto, “trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”  Never click on a link or provide personal information unless you have absolutely confirmed that the email or text message received by you is legitimate.  In this case, if you had any thought that the email might be legitimate, you should contact Amazon directly at an email address or telephone number that you know is accurate.  Don’t respond to phone numbers or email addresses contained in the email itself.

Scam of the day – May 13, 2015 – What to do if your email is hacked

May 13, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Yesterday I told you about a scam which starts when you receive an email that appears to come from one of your friends, but in actuality is coming from a scammer who has hacked into your friend’s email account is sending out messages that appear to come from your friend touting a product.  We have all received these emails and hopefully, you just immediately delete them after informing your friend that his or her email account has been hacked and scam emails are being sent to everyone on his or her email address list.

But what do you do if you are the person whose email has been hacked?

TIPS

1. Change your password on your email account. If you use the same password for other accounts, you should change those as well.
2. Change your security question. I often suggest that people use a nonsensical security question because the information could not be guessed or gathered online. For instance, you may want the question to be “What is your favorite color?” with the answer being “seven.”
3. Report the hacking to your email provider.
4. Contact the people on your email list and tell them you have been hacked and not to click on links in emails that appear to come from you. 5.  Scan your computer thoroughly with an up to date anti-virus and anti-malware program. This is important because the hacker may have tried to install a keystroke logging malware program that can steal all of the information from your computer.
6. Review the settings on your email, particularly make sure that your email is not being forwarded somewhere.
7. Get a free copy of your credit report. You can get your free credit reports from www.annualcreditreport.com. Some other sites promise free credit reports, but sign you up for other services that you probably don’t want or need.
7. Consider putting a credit freeze on your credit report. You can find information about credit freezes here on Scamicide.com

Scam of the day – March 2, 2015 – IRS phishing email

March 2, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes, as many others do, from my own email.  It is a phishing email currently being sent to people purporting to be from the IRS that attempts to lure people who receive the email into clicking on links in the emails in order to update their income tax information.  Unfortunately, when you click on the link one of two things will happen and both of them are bad.  In some instances, you will be prompted to provide personal information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft.  In other instances, by clicking on the link, you will download keystroke logging malware that will steal information from your computer or other electronic device and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.

TIPS

The first indication that this is a phishing email is that although it purports to have been sent by the IRS, the email address from which it was sent is not that of the IRS.  Most likely the email address indicated is that of an innocent person whose email has been hacked into and taken over by an identity thief and made a part of a network of zombie computers used to send out such phishing emails.  This network is called a botnet.  In addition, the email asks you to validate your electronic filing status, which the IRS will never ask you to do.  If you need to get an Electronic Filing PIN in order to file your tax return electronically with the IRS, you will need to go to http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/Electronic-Filing-PIN-Request where you will be prompted to provide information to verify your identity before receiving a PIN.  In regard to the Form 1098 T that this phishing email describes, that is a form that educational institutions file with the government in regard to reimbursements or refunds of qualified tuition and related expenses.  The IRS would not be providing that form to you.

The most important thing to remember is that the IRS will never initiate contact with you on any matter by an email or text message so whenever you get one that purports to be from the IRS, you should just delete it.  If you have the slightest thought that any such communication is legitimate, you should merely contact the IRS directly to inquire about it.

Scam of the day – February 23, 2015 – Chase Online bill pay scam

February 23, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Today’s Scam of the day comes from my own email, however, I am sure many of you have received this, as well.  It is a phishing email that is intended to lure the recipient into providing personal information that will be used to make that person a victim of identity theft.  As typical with this type of phishing email, it is intended to make you think there is an emergency to which you must respond.  It looks pretty official, but there are some telltale signs that it is a scam.  First, is that although I did not include the email address of the sender, the email address is that of a private individual, not Chase although often identity thieves will use email addresses that appear to be official.  In this case, undoubtedly the email address used is part of a botnet whereby identity thieves have infiltrated the computers of innocent victims and then use their computers and email accounts to send out the fraudulent email.  Another telltale sign is that the email is directed to me, not by name, but rather as “Dear Customer.”   However, even if the email was directed to you by name, you couldn’t trust it because when JP Morgan Chase was hacked in the last year, the hackers stole names and email addresses.   Finally, the email appears to have been sent by Christopher Polumbo.  Christopher Palumbo is a Vice President at Chase, however, the email to me misspells his name.  However, it is easy to see how people would fall for this scam and provide the information that would enable an identity thief to gain access to your account.

Here  is a copy of the email I received.

“Dear Customer, 
We are writing to let you know that the service(s) listed below will be deactivated and deleted if your profile is not verified within 7 business days. Previous notifications have been sent to the Billing Contact assigned to your account.
As the Primary Contact, you must renew the service(s) listed below:

SERVICE: Chase Online and Bill Pay services. 
What you need to do:

1. Log in to your account through our enhanced security server www.Chase.comby clicking the URL.
2. 
Enter your user ID and Password (that you selected during the online enrollment process). 
3. 
Enter the requested information and your Chase Online and Bill Pay services will be renewed. 
If you have not signed up for online access, you can enroll easily by clicking “Enroll” at the bottom of the Login page. 
Please do not reply to this message directly but click on the URL. For questions, please call Customer Service at the number on the back of your card. We are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Sincerely,

Christopher Polumbo
Chase Online(SM)
Fraud Prevention Team

This site is directed at persons in the United States only. Persons outside the United States may visit International Banking . 
Links to third party sites are provided for your convenience by JPMorgan Chase. JPMorgan Chase neither endorses nor guarantees any offerings of the third party providers, nor does JPMorgan Chase make any representation or warranty of any kind about the content, use of or inability to use, the third party sites.

© JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Member FDIC ©2015 JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Co”

TIPS

As I have warned you many times, you should never click on links in emails or text messages or provide information in response to such emails or text messages unless you have absolutely confirmed that the communication is legitimate, which is easy to do by merely contacting the company.  In this case, you could just contact Chase at the telephone number on your credit card or bank statement.  Providing information without confirming that the communication is legitimate gives the identity thief all that they need to make you a victim of identity theft.  In other variations of this phishing email, merely by clicking on the links provided will result in keystroke logging malware being downloaded on to your computer which can steal your personal information from your computer and then enable its use for purposes of identity theft.  Even if you have good security software installed on your computer or other electronic device, as you should, this may not protect you from keystroke logging malware because the latest malware is always at least a month ahead of the latest security software updates.  Remember my motto, “Trust me, you can’t trust anyone.”

As for this particular Chase phishing email, if you receive it, Chase requests that you forward it to them at abuse@chase.com.

Scam of the day – February 21, 2015 – Child predator email scam

February 21, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Parents are always concerned about the dangers posed by child predators so it is easy to understand that so many people are falling victim to a scam that starts when the parents receive a phony email warning about a child predator now living in their community.  The email appears to be an official notification generated based on the email recipient’s zip code.  The email promises to provide more specific information about the predator threat by clicking on a link provided in the email.  Clicking on the link takes the victim to the website of a company that provides localized reports on child predators.  Unfortunately, clicking on the link also downloads keystroke logging malware that will steal the information from your computer or other electronic device and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.

TIPS

Once again, it is important to remember that you should never click on links in emails or text messages regardless of how legitimate they may appear unless you have absolutely confirmed that the email or message is legitimate.  Regardless of how legitimate it may appear, the chances of downloading dangerous keystroke logging malware that can lead to your becoming a victim of identity theft is just too great.  For free information about sex offenders in your area, you can go to the National Sex Offender Public Website set up by the Department of Justice.  Here is a link to their website: http://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/registry

Scam of the day – February 16, 2015 – Turbo Tax scam update

February 16, 2015 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

As I reported to you previously, earlier this month following a rash of fraudulent state income tax filings using Turbo Tax software in nineteen states, Turbo Tax temporarily suspended electronic state income tax filings through Turbo Tax.  Although the matter is still under investigation, it does not appear that Turbo Tax was hacked.  More likely it is that identity thieves who already obtained the Social Security  numbers of their victims were using Turbo Tax’s convenient software to file fraudulent return in which they claim phony refunds.  On the federal level, this is a 5.2 billion dollar problem annually.  Now, enterprising identity thieves are sending out phishing emails that appear to be sent by Turbo Tax in which the email recipient is told that there is a problem with the person’s electronically filed income tax return and that they need to click on a link and provide personal information in order to rectify the problem.  This is a scam that is intended either to lure the victim into downloading keystroke logging malware that will steal personal information from the victim’s computer or other electronic device and use that information to make the person  a victim of identity theft or to lure the victim into providing the personal information directly to the identity thief posing as Turbo Tax.

TIPS

Whenever you get an email or a text message either asking for personal information directly or instructing you to click on a link, you should not respond until you have absolutely confirmed that the email or text message is legitimate.  Making a counterfeit email look official is child’s play so even if the communication looks legitimate, you should not trust it.  The better course of action is to contact the company directly at a telephone number, email address or website that you know is legitimate to confirm whether the original communication was legitimate.  Scammers and identity thieves always take advantage of the latest public concerns to convince people to provide information used to make them victims of identity theft.