Scam of the day – November 11, 2015 – Indictments unsealed in major cybercriminal enterprise

Yesterday federal prosecutors unsealed a 23 count 68 page indictment of three men, Gery Shalon, Joshua Samuel Aaron and Ziv Orenstein on charges related to a massive and intricate list of cybercrimes including, security fraud, identity theft, computer hacking, wire fraud and money laundering that earned them hundreds of millions of dollars.  Among the companies they are accused of hacking into are J. P. Morgan Chase, from which they stole personal information of 83 million people, E*Trade, Scottrade and Dow Jones.  They are accused of using the stolen data to advance securities frauds in which they manipulated the price of the stocks.  They also are accused of operating illegal online gambling websites from which they made millions of dollars every month and running their own financial operations by which they processed millions of dollars of illegal transactions for other criminals for a fee.  Their money was laundered through more than 75 shell companies, banks and brokerage accounts around the world. The indictments trace back their criminal activities to 2007.  Their actions were extremely complex and we can expect more and more details to emerge in the days and weeks ahead.

TIPS

This case again emphasizes the fact that each of us is only as secure as the places with the weakest security that hold our personal information.  However, many of the victims of the stock frauds the defendants are alleged to have committed became victims when they trusted emails that appeared to be legitimate urging them to invest in various stocks.  The lesson is to never trust an email with a stock tip regardless of from whom it appears to come.  Never invest in a stock until you have thoroughly and independently investigated it.

Scam of the day – October 5, 2014 – More banks hacked by suspected hackers of J.P. Morgan Chase

With news of the massive data breach at J.P. Morgan Chase in which names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses of 76 million households and 7 million small businesses were stolen by what appears to be Russian hackers who may or may not be affiliated with the Russian government dominating the news, it seems perfectly appropriate to wish you a happy National Cybersecurity Awareness month.  As frightening as the spectre of a major American bank being vulnerable to vulnerable to such a massive data breach, you may remember that when the story broke last August of the possible data breach at J.P. Morgan Chase, reports were that there were as many as four other banks that had similarly been hacked.  Now, according to a report in the New York Times, that number is actually risen to nine other major financial institutions that may have suffered data breaches at the hands of the same hackers.  Therefore even if you are not a customer of J.P. Morgan Chase, you should be extra vigilant in regard to all of your financial accounts.

TIPS

Now is the time to implement a eight step approach to protecting yourself from identity theft and data breaches.  The first step is to change your password regularly, such as every six months.  A good password has a mixture of capital letters, small letters, symbols and digits.  Don’t use any word in the dictionary because hackers have computer programs that can guess your password. Instead use a phrase, such as IHate2UsePasswords!!.  This is a very secure password.  You should also have a separate and distinct password for each of your accounts, but you can merely adapt this basic password by adding a couple of distinguishing letters for each account.  For example, you could make this your Amazon password by adding the letters “Am” at the end of your basic password so it reads IHate2UsePasswords!!Am.  This is easy to remember.

You should also use dual factor authentication on your accounts when available.  Dual factor identification provides you with an extra level of security by which more than a password is necessary to gain access to your account.  Generally, when you log in through your password to an account a code is then sent to your smartphone which you then must input in order to access your account.

You also should change the answer to your security question to something completely nonsensical.  Answering a security question is required if you forget your password or if you want to change your password.  Unfortunately the answers to common security questions, such as your mother’s maiden name can be found with a little effort by an identity thief in the many places on the Internet that store personal information.  So instead of the answer to your mother’s maiden name being “Jones,” change it to “Grapefruit.”  No identity thief will find it or guess it and it is silly enough for you to remember.

Don’t click on links or download attachments in any email, text message or social media posting unless you have absolutely confirmed that it is legitimate.  Identity thieves and hackers lure people into clicking on links in such communications that results in the victims downloading keystroke logging malware that can steal all of the information from your computer.

Don’t provide personal information over the phone to anyone whom you have not called.  You can never be sure if the person calling you is legitimate regardless of how compelling the reason he or she gives for you to provide personal information.  Don’t rely on your Caller ID because through a technique called “spoofing” an identity thief can make it appear that his or her call is from the IRS, your bank or some other legitimate entity.  If you think the call may be legitimate, hang up and call the company or agency at a number that you know is real, not the number the caller gives you.

Review all of your accounts regularly and carefully to note the smallest charge that should not be there.  Sometimes identity thieves will put regular reoccurring charges on your credit card or phone bill in the hope that you will not bother to look further into it because the charge is so small.  The earlier you catch identity theft, the easier it is to deal with.

Check your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting agencies every year for evidence of fraud or even mistakes that need to be corrected.  Here is the link to the only official place to get your free credit report https://www.annualcreditreport.com/index.action

Put a credit freeze on your credit report so that even if an identity thief obtains your Social Security number, he or she cannot gain access to your credit report.  Yesterday’s Scam of the day contains the links to the credit reporting agencies to use to freeze your credit.

Scam of the day – October 4, 2014 – J.P. Morgan update and credit freeze information

Last Thursday, in a required SEC filing,  J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. reported that the data breach, which we reported to you about when it was first discovered during the summer, was much larger than initially thought.  At the time, J.P. Morgan believed that only a million accounts were compromised, but now, J.P. Morgan is indicated that information on 76 million households and 7 million small businesses was stolen by hackers thought to be from Russia or another Eastern European country.  According to the SEC filing, J.P. Morgan says that the information stolen included names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses.  At this time J.P. Morgan is saying that they are not aware of fraudulent activities tied to the data breach and that no account numbers, passwords, user IDs or Social Security numbers were stolen.  The data breach apparently began in June and went on until discovered in mid August, which is especially troubling because it provided time for the hackers to cover their tracks for what may have been their true goal.  The hackers did manage to gain access to the entire list of applications and programs used by J.P. Morgan Chase on its computers which could then be evaluated by the hackers for inevitable vulnerabilities that could be exploited at a later time.  Obviously J.P. Morgan is busy trying to protect against this threat.

TIPS

For customers of J.P. Morgan Chase, now is not the time to run and hide nor take your money out of the bank.  In fact, at the time that the FBI began its initial investigation of this data breach during the summer, it indicated that it was looking into possible data breaches of as many as four other banks as well.  It may well be that we are not yet aware of the breaches that occurred and may still be going on in other banks.  You can expect either the hackers, people who the hackers sell the information they gathered and even totally independent identity thieves to start contacting people through emails, text messages and phone calls purporting to be from J.P. Morgan Chase.  In these contacts, they will attempt to lure unsuspecting victims into providing personal information under various guises or clicking on links to obtain what may appear to be important information.  However, if you provide that personal information all you will do is end up a victim of identity thief.  If you click on the links in emails or text messages appearing to be from J.P. Morgan you may well end up downloading keystroke logging malware that will steal all of the information from your computer that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft.  Trust me, you can’t trust anyone.  Even if your Caller ID appears to show that the call you receive is form J. P. Morgan Chase, scammers are able to make their calls appear to be from J.P. Morgan Chase through a tactic called spoofing.  The best course of action if you receive any purported communication from the bank is to not respond directly, but instead contact the bank independently on your own to find out what the truth is.

This also may be a good time to consider putting a credit freeze on your credit report so that even if someone manages to obtain your Social Security number and other personal information, they will be unable to access your credit report and run up large debt in your name.  A separate credit freeze needs to be established at each of the three major credit reporting agencies to be effective.  Here are the links to the pages at Experian, TransUnion and Equifax where you can put a credit freeze on your report and get some peace of mind.

TransUnion http://www.transunion.com/personal-credit/credit-disputes/credit-freezes.page

Equifax https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp

Experian https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html