Scam of the day – April 16, 2017 – Federal Express phishing email

Shown below is a copy of an email that I received recently that purports to be from Federal Express urging me to click on a link to the oddly worded “message with the required information” without any indication as to to what the “required information” relates.  This is just another clever, legitimate appearing phishing email attempting to lure me into clicking on the link.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK.  Clicking on the link either in an email that you might receive or the one shown below  would either take you to another legitimate looking page where you would be prompted to input personal information that would be used to make you a victim of identity theft or would download on to your computer a keystroke logging program that will steal all of the information from your computer including passwords, credit card numbers, your Social Security number and other personal information that would be used to make you a victim of identity theft.   Phishing emails like this are also used to trick people into unwittingly downloading ransomware. If you look closely at the email, you will note that even though it has the Federal Express logo and looks quite official, there are a number of tip offs that this is indeed a phishing scam.  What is not shown on the email as copied below is that it is sent from an address that is not that of Federal Express.  The email of the sender is that of a private individual who, most likely, had his or her email account hacked and used as a part of a botnet to send out these types of phishing emails.  The email also never refers to me by name.only refers to me as customer rather than by my name.  It is also important not to click on the “unsubscribe” link because that too may be loaded with malware.

FedEx Express

We have sent you a message with the required information.
Click here to open this email in your browser.

Thanks for choosing FedEx®.

More details
This message was sent to **************. Please click unsubscribe if you don’t want to receive these messages from FedEx Express in the future.
©2017 FedEx. The content of this message is protected by copyright and trademark laws under U.S. and international law.
Review our privacy policy. All rights reserved

TIPS

If you receive on any email from a company that asks you to click on a link, you should hesitate to do so, particularly if it appears bogus as this one does.  If you have the slightest thought that the email may be legitimate, rather than click on the link, go to the website of the company, which in this case is www.fedex.com or call them directly at 1-800-463-3339.

Scam of the day – December 23, 2012 – Federal Express Phishing scam

Shown below is a copy of an email that I received recently that purports to be from Federal Express informing me that a delivery was attempted to be made to me of a package someone had sent to me, but that the attempt was unsuccessful.  The email instructs me to click on a link to print out a postal receipt to take to the nearest Federal Express office in order to retrieve the package.  Don’t click on the link either in an email that you might receive or the one shown below because to do so would only download on to your computer a keystroke logging program that will steal all of the information from your computer including passwords, credit card numbers, your Social Security number and other personal information that would end up making you a victim of identity theft.  If you look closely at the email, you will note that even though it has the Federal Express logo and looks quite official, there are a number of tip offs that this is indeed a phishing scam intended to look like a legitimate email, but actually intended to get you to download malware.  What is not shown on the email as copied below is that it is sent from an address that is not that of Federal Express.  The email also only refers to me as customer rather than by my name.  It is also important to note that the communication came to my email address which is not information that Federal Express has for the receiver of a delivery.  The email also refers to “the post office” while Federal Express deliveries are not made to post office.  Finally, you should note the poor grammar where it reads, “go to the nearest our office.”  Poor English grammar is often an indication of a scam that has not originated in the United States or an English speaking country.

TIPS

If you receive on any email from a company that asks you to click on a link, you should hesitate to do so, particularly if it appears bogus as this one does.  If you have the slightest thought that the email may be legitimate, rather than click on the link, go to the website of the company, which in this case is www.fedex.com.  If you had done so in this particular case you would have found a holiday email scam alert informing you that the email is a scam.

Here is the copy of the email I received.

FedEx  
   
Order: VGH-5698-0841660613  
Order Date: Friday, 14 December 2012, 01:21 PM<*+++/td>

Dear Customer,

Your parcel has arrived at the post office at December 20.Our courier was unable to deliver the parcel to you.

To receive a parcel, please, go to the nearest our office and show this receipt.

 

     

DOWNLOAD POSTAL RECEIPT

    Best Regards, The FedEx Team.  

Scam of the day – November 22, 2012 – Special delivery scam

One of the latest holiday scams involves you receiving a note on your front door that appears to come from either the United States Postal Service, UPS or Federal Express indicating that delivery of a special delivery package was attempted, but that you were not home.  You are then given a telephone number to call to arrange for delivery of the package.  Unfortunately, you are put on hold for an inordinately long time.  Even more unfortunately, the telephone number you have called is a premium number like a 900 number that carries huge charges and the longer you stay on the line, the greater the charges.

TIPS

Don’t think that merely because the number you are calling is not a 900 number that it may not be a premium number that can cost you money.  When you receive such a notice of an attempted delivery, you cannot be sure that the notice is legitimate.  The best thing you can do is to call either the United States Postal Service, UPS or Federal Express directly at a phone number that you know is accurate to follow up on the notice.  If you did not do so and you end up with huge phone charges, you can dispute the charges with your phone carrier and have them removed from your bill.