Scam of the day – July 30. 2017 – AOL phishing scam

Millions of people still use AOL.  One reason is that you get greater email privacy when compared to some other email carriers. Due to its popularity, scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is quite poor.  Compare it to the excellent counterfeit phishing email I included in the Scam of the Day for May 31, 2014.  This one comes from an email address that has no relation to the company, AOL.  Further, it is not directed to the recipient specifically by name.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve a problem.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.   Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:
“Dear Aol User
You can not send or receive new messages until you re-validate your mailbox.
To renew the mailbox,
Click below: Login&Complete
Thank you!
Webmail Administrator.”
TIPS
When AOL communicates with its customers about their accounts, they do so by AOL Certified Mail, which will appear as a blue envelope in your inbox and will have an official AOL Mail seal on the border of the email.  This particular email had neither and only had an easy to counterfeit AOL logo appear on the email.  Whenever you get an email, you cannot be sure of from whom it really comes.  Never click on a link unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate.  If you think the email might be legitimate, The best thing to do is to contact the real company that the email purports to be from at an address or phone number that you know is accurate in order to find out if the communication was legitimate or not. Remember, never click on links in emails unless you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

Scam of the day – September 22, 2016 – New Aol phishing scam

Millions of people still use AOL.  One reason is that you get greater email privacy when compared to some other email carriers. Due to its popularity, scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is quite poor.  Compare it to the excellent counterfeit phishing email I included in the Scam of the Day for May 31, 2014.  This one comes from an email address that has no relation to the company, AOL.  Further, it is not directed to the recipient specifically by name.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve a problem.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.   Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:
AOL HELP.
Your two incoming mails were placed on pending status due to the recent upgrade to our database,In order to receive the messages CLICK HERE to Login and wait for response from AOL Mail.We apologies for any inconveniences
Best Regards,
The AOL! Mail Team
TIPS
When AOL communicates with its customers about their accounts, they do so by AOL Certified Mail, which will appear as a blue envelope in your inbox and will have an official AOL Mail seal on the border of the email.  This particular email had neither and only had an easy to counterfeit Aol logo appear on the email.  Whenever you get an email, you cannot be sure of from whom it really comes.  Never click on a link unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate.  If you think the email might be legitimate, The best thing to do is to contact the real company that the email purports to be from at an address or phone number that you know is accurate in order to find out if the communication was legitimate or not.  Remember, never click on links in emails unless you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

Scam of the day – December 24, 2015 – Latest AOL phishing scam

Millions of people still use AOL.  One reason is that you get greater privacy as to your email when compared to some other email carriers. Due to its popularity, scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is quite poor.  Compare it to the excellent counterfeit phishing email I included in the Scam of the Day for May 31, 2014.  This one comes from an email address that has no relation to the company, AOL.  Further, it is not directed to the recipient specifically by name.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve an problem.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.   Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:
“Dear AOL Users,

Your account has some security Issues and need to be fixed at once
In order to avoid suspension Click Here and Log in To fix the issues.

Regards,
Customer Team

Sincerely,
AOL Member Service”

TIPS
When AOL communicates with its customers about their accounts, they do so by AOL Certified Mail, which will appear as a blue envelope in your inbox and will have an official AOL Mail seal on the border of the email.  This particular email had neither and didn’t even have an AOL logo appear on the email.  Whenever you get an email, you cannot be sure of from whom it really comes.  Never click on a link unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate.  The better course of action is to contact the real company that the email purports to be from at an address or phone number that you know is accurate in order to find out if the communication was legitimate or not.  Remember, never click on links in emails unless you have confirmed that they are legitimate.

Scam of the day – November 8, 2015 – More AOL phishing scams

I have written about AOL phishing scams many times, but an abundance of AOL phishing emails that are presently being circulated make this a topic worth writing about again. Reproduced below are three of them, the last of which is a phishing email about a generic account that doesn’t even attempt to tell you the name of your email carrier.   Scammers and identity thieves send out phishing emails to lure people into clicking on links in these emails that will either download keystroke logging malware on to the victim’s computer that will enable the identity thief to steal personal information from the victim’s computer and use it to make him or her a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link, the victim will be directed to an official looking page requesting personal information under some legitimate sounding guise.  If the victim provides the requested personal information, it is used to make him a victim of identity theft.

“Aol!
Dear Member,Your mail-box might be shutdown within 24hrs due to your recent termination request. To cancel RE-SET , Log-in and wait response from Aol.

Sincerely

Webmail 2015 Security Team”

and

“​​A0l.​
​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Account Termination

​Dear A0L User,

We received your request to terminate your A0L Mail Account and the process has started by our A0L Mail Team, Please give us 2 working days to close your A0L Mail Account.
​​please if you did not wish to termination , click below and sign in to cancel the termination request :”

This last one is not specific to AOL, but contains many of the same phishing elements:

Dear User,
Your E-mail has exceeded the storage limit. You can not send or receive new messages until you re-validate your mail.  To re-validate the mailbox:- = Click to restore

Thank you!
Mail Administrator.”

TIPS

Phishing emails such as these always wish to create a sense that immediate action is required in order to avoid some negative event such as your account being closed.  These particular emails are easy to identify as scams.  None of them came from an email address that was connected with an email provider.  In fact, they all came from personal email addresses that were probably those of innocent victims of a botnet where a cybercriminal takes control of the computers of innocent people and uses those computers to send out phishing emails and other such communications.  None of the emails reproduced above carried a company logo although, this is easy to counterfeit and shouldn’t be something that makes you consider such emails to automatically be legitimate if you do receive an email with an official corporate logo.  Finally, such phishing emails often contain, as these do, grammatical or spelling errors.  You should never click on any link or provide any personal information in response to an email unless you are absolutely sure that it is legitimate and safe to provide the requested information.  The best thing you can do is to contact the company that is purporting to be sending the email and inquire as to the legitimacy of the email you received.
​​

Scam of the day – July 6, 2014 – Another AOL phishing scam

Millions of people still use AOL and so scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is quite poor.  Compare it to the excellent counterfeit phishing email I included in the Scam of the Day for May 31, 2014.  This one comes from an email address that has no relation to the company, AOL.  It does not contain any logo and it is not directed to the recipient specifically by name.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve an problem.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.   Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:

“Dear User,

Verify, to update your Premium Acc today

Service Team.

America Online”

TIPS

There are numerous reasons not to trust this email.  The email address from which it was sent has no relation to AOL.  It is not addressed to you personally.  It does not contain an AOL logo and the email is far too short and curt.  It is an obvious phishing email and its only purpose is to lure you into either providing personal information or downloading malware.  As I have warned you many times, never click on links or download attachments unless you are absolutely sure that the email is legitimate.  In this case, if you even had a slight thought that it might be legitimate, all you would have to do is to call the real AOL to learn that this was a phishing scam.

Scam of the day – May 31, 2014 – AOL customer support scam

Millions of people still use AOL and so scammers and identity thieves will often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is a good counterfeit, however, the repeated faulty grammar is a strong indication that this is a scam.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve an emergency.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.  This particular email appears to be signed by Bud Rosenthal, who actually is an AOL officer, however, the email address from which it is sent is that of a student at a university whose email has been hijacked and made a part of a botnet of zombie computers used to send out the scam emails.  Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:

 

 

AOL
Due to the recent signed in of your Account from an unknown location, you are advice toClick here to confirm the validity of your  AOL® Online Account.Thanks once again for choosing our service.

Bud Rosenthal
Bud Rosenthal, AOL Membership Group CEO

Privacy Policy | Customer Support
©2014 AOL, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 TIPS

There are numerous reasons not to trust this email.  The email address from which it was sent has no relation to AOL.  It is not addressed to you personally.  It contains faulty grammar.  It is an obvious phishing email and its only purpose is to lure you into either providing personal information or downloading malware.  As I have warned you many times, never click on links or download attachments unless you are absolutely sure that the email is legitimate.  In this case, if you even had a slight thought that it might be legitimate, all you would have to do is to call the real AOL to learn that this was a phishing scam.