Posts Tagged: ‘aol identity theft’

Scam of the day – July 6, 2014 – Another AOL phishing scam

July 6, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Millions of people still use AOL and so scammers and identity thieves often send out phishing emails that appear to come from AOL, such as the one reproduced below.  The logo and format of this particular email that is presently circulating is quite poor.  Compare it to the excellent counterfeit phishing email I included in the Scam of the Day for Mary 31, 2014.  This one comes from an email address that has no relation to the company, AOL.  It does not contain any logo and it is not directed to the recipient specifically by name.  Like many similar scams, this one works by luring you into clicking on a link in the email in order to resolve an problem.  However, if you click on the link, one of two things will happen.  You either will be prompted to provide information that will be used to make you a victim of identity theft or by clicking on the link you will unwittingly download a keystroke logging malware program that will steal all of the information from your computer and use it to make you a victim of identity theft.   Here is how the email appears.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK:

“Dear User,

Verify, to update your Premium Acc today

Service Team.

America Online”

TIPS

There are numerous reasons not to trust this email.  The email address from which it was sent has no relation to AOL.  It is not addressed to you personally.  It does not contain an AOL logo and the email is far too short and curt.  It is an obvious phishing email and its only purpose is to lure you into either providing personal information or downloading malware.  As I have warned you many times, never click on links or download attachments unless you are absolutely sure that the email is legitimate.  In this case, if you even had a slight thought that it might be legitimate, all you would have to do is to call the real AOL to learn that this was a phishing scam.

Scam of the day – March 12, 2014 – More AOL scams

March 12, 2014 Posted by Steven Weisman, Esq.

Although it is nowhere near as popular as it once was, America Online (AOL) is still used for email by more than 2.5 million people and that means that it will be a target for identity thieves and hackers who are constantly sending out new “phishing” emails attempting to lure people into clicking on tainted links that are infected with malware.  When the unwary receiver of the email clicks on the link, he or she unwittingly downloads keystroke logging malware on to his or her computer or other device that will steal personal information from the victim’s device and use it to make the person a victim of identity theft.   Phishing is the name for the tactic when an identity thief sends a message that looks like it is from a legitimate source and persuades the victim to respond by either clicking on a link that will download malware or into providing requested personal information that will be used to make the person a victim of identity theft.  Here are a couple of examples of AOL phishing emails presently being circulated.  DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINKS.

Dear Valid User,

Your account was accessed from a device we did not recognize 69.80.22.206 at (Ireland )  09:00 Irish Standard Time). If you did not check it from another device, please CLICK HERE to your account.

Sincerely, Aol Service.”

and

“User,
Click here now to confirm the validity of your account.

 Thanks again for choosing our Service.
Sincerely, America Online Team”
TIPS
You will notice that the first example had a good reproduction of the AOL logo and what appears to be a legitimate reason to contact you.  The second example is pretty shoddy and does not appear terribly official.  It is also important to note that in both instances, these emails are being sent from email addresses that were stolen by hackers who hacked into and took control of the email accounts of legitimate AOL users.  However, the addresses do not indicate anything to make you think that it is an official address for AOL as a company.  The key lesson to remember, however, is that regardless of how legitimate an email looks that contains an email or an attachment, you should never click on the link or download the attachment until you have confirmed that it is legitimate.  You can never be sure when you receive an email or text message as to who is really sending it.  The best course of action is to always confirm that it is legitimate before clicking on any link or downloading any attachment.  In this case a call or email to the real AOL should have been done by anyone who had the slightest thought that the emails might have been legitimate.