Scam of the day – September 14, 2015 – Federal government unveils new cybersecurity plan

It is no secret that the federal government, as evidenced by the recent hacking of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in which personnel data on 22 million people was stolen, is a target of hackers, both nation-state and ordinary (or perhaps not so ordinary) criminals.  The OPM data breach was initiated as was the Target data breach and 90% of all data breaches through a phishing email.  A phishing email is an email sent by the hacker that appears to be legitimate and lures the victim at the targeted company or agency to click on a link or download an attachment that contain malware that enables the hacker to steal the information contained in the victim’s computer system.  It is fascinating in almost all major data breaches, the most complex and sophisticated malware is downloaded on to the victim’s computer through the simple trickery of phishing.  Here is a link to a column I wrote about this last year.  http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2014/10/18/malware-data-breach-phishing/17458411/

In response to the OPM and other data breaches, William Evanina, the Director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center has announced a new campaign to raise the awareness of federal workers to the dangers of phishing and specifically targeted phishing emails referred to as spear phishing.

TIPS

Phishing and spear phishing represent threats not just to companies and governmental agencies, but to all of us as individuals as well.  Identity theft is often accomplished through individuals being targeted by phishing or spear phishing emails who unwittingly click on links or download attachments that contain keystroke logging malware that enables the identity thief to steal all of the information including passwords, credit card numbers, Social Security numbers and other personal information from the victim’s computer and use that information to make that person a victim of identity theft.  Other types of malware, such as ransomware, which encrypts and locks all of the data in your computer, followed by a threat to destroy your data unless you pay a ransom, is generally downloaded through clicking on a link or downloading an attachment from a phishing email.

The key to avoiding becoming a victim is to never click on a link or download any attachment unless you have absolutely confirmed that the link or attachment is legitimate.  Even if the link is contained in an email from someone you know and trust, it is possible that their email may have been hijacked so you must always be a bit skeptical.  It may seem a bit paranoid, but remember that even paranoids have enemies.

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